The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

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The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

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Title: The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians
Author: Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D.; Claridy, Mechelle D.; Earle, Rebecca L.; Kaplan, Lee Michael

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Citation: Stanford, Fatima Cody, Erica D. Johnson, Mechelle D. Claridy, Rebecca L. Earle, and Lee M. Kaplan. 2015. “The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians.” International Journal of Family Medicine 2015: 1–8. doi:10.1155/2015/841249.
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Abstract: Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices a liated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20–39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40–49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008–0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004–0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. ere is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight.
Published Version: 10.1155/2015/841249
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34853260
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