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dc.contributor.authorMonnig, Mollie A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKahler, Christopher W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCioe, Patricia A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMonti, Peter M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMayer, Kenneth H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPantalone, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Ronald A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRamratnam, Bharaten_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T20:43:39Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.citationMonnig, Mollie A., Christopher W. Kahler, Patricia A. Cioe, Peter M. Monti, Kenneth H. Mayer, David W. Pantalone, Ronald A. Cohen, and Bharat Ramratnam. 2017. “Markers of Microbial Translocation and Immune Activation Predict Cognitive Processing Speed in Heavy-Drinking Men Living with HIV.” Microorganisms 5 (4): 64. doi:10.3390/microorganisms5040064. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms5040064.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:34868988
dc.description.abstractHIV infection and alcohol use disorder are associated with deficits in neurocognitive function. Emerging evidence points to pro-inflammatory perturbations of the gut-brain axis as potentially contributing to neurocognitive impairment in the context of HIV and chronic heavy alcohol use. This study examined whether plasma markers of microbial translocation (LPS) from the gastrointestinal tract and related immune activation (sCD14, EndoCAb) were associated with neurocognition in 21 men living with HIV who were virally suppressed on antiretroviral therapy. All participants met federal criteria for heavy drinking and were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a brief alcohol intervention. This secondary analysis utilized blood samples and cognitive scores (learning, memory, executive function, verbal fluency, and processing speed) obtained at baseline and three-month follow-up of the RCT. In generalized estimating equation models, LPS, sCD14, and EndoCAb individually were significant predictors of processing speed. In a model with all biomarkers, higher LPS and sCD14 both remained significant predictors of lower processing speed. These preliminary findings suggest that inflammation stemming from HIV and/or alcohol could have negative effects on the gut-brain axis, manifested as diminished processing speed. Associations of microbial translocation and immune activation with processing speed in heavy-drinking PLWH warrant further investigation in larger-scale studies.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3390/microorganisms5040064en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748573/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectgut-brain axisen
dc.subjectHIV infectionen
dc.subjectalcohol use disorderen
dc.subjectheavy drinkingen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectmicrobial translocationen
dc.subjectmonocyte activationen
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectprocessing speeden
dc.titleMarkers of Microbial Translocation and Immune Activation Predict Cognitive Processing Speed in Heavy-Drinking Men Living with HIVen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalMicroorganismsen
dash.depositing.authorMayer, Kenneth H.en_US
dc.date.available2018-02-26T20:43:39Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/microorganisms5040064*
dash.contributor.affiliatedMayer, Kenneth


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