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dc.contributor.authorWong, Wesleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWenger, Edward A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHartl, Daniel L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Dyann F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T15:57:35Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.citationWong, Wesley, Edward A. Wenger, Daniel L. Hartl, and Dyann F. Wirth. 2018. “Modeling the genetic relatedness of Plasmodium falciparum parasites following meiotic recombination and cotransmission.” PLoS Computational Biology 14 (1): e1005923. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005923. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005923.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35014361
dc.description.abstractUnlike in most pathogens, multiple-strain (polygenomic) infections of P. falciparum are frequently composed of genetic siblings. These genetic siblings are the result of sexual reproduction and can coinfect the same host when cotransmitted by the same mosquito. The degree with which coinfecting strains are related varies among infections and populations. Because sexual recombination occurs within the mosquito, the relatedness of cotransmitted strains could depend on transmission dynamics, but little is actually known of the factors that influence the relatedness of cotransmitted strains. Part of the uncertainty stems from an incomplete understanding of how within-host and within-vector dynamics affect cotransmission. Cotransmission is difficult to examine experimentally but can be explored using a computational model. We developed a malaria transmission model that simulates sexual reproduction in order to understand what determines the relatedness of cotransmitted strains. This study highlights how the relatedness of cotransmitted strains depends on both within-host and within-vector dynamics including the complexity of infection. We also used our transmission model to analyze the genetic relatedness of polygenomic infections following a series of multiple transmission events and examined the effects of superinfection. Understanding the factors that influence the relatedness of cotransmitted strains could lead to a better understanding of the population-genetic correlates of transmission and therefore be important for public health.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005923en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5777656/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectParasitologyen
dc.subjectParasite Groupsen
dc.subjectApicomplexaen
dc.subjectOocystsen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectParasitic Diseasesen
dc.subjectCell Biologyen
dc.subjectCellular Typesen
dc.subjectAnimal Cellsen
dc.subjectHepatocytesen
dc.subjectAnatomyen
dc.subjectLiveren
dc.subjectCell Processesen
dc.subjectCell Cycle and Cell Divisionen
dc.subjectMeiosisen
dc.subjectChromosome Biologyen
dc.subjectSporozoitesen
dc.subjectInfectious Diseasesen
dc.subjectSuperinfectionen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectHealth Economicsen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectGerm Cellsen
dc.subjectGametocytesen
dc.titleModeling the genetic relatedness of Plasmodium falciparum parasites following meiotic recombination and cotransmissionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS Computational Biologyen
dash.depositing.authorHartl, Daniel L.en_US
dc.date.available2018-03-20T15:57:35Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005923*
dash.contributor.affiliatedWirth, Dyann
dash.contributor.affiliatedHartl, Daniel


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