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dc.contributor.authorDenis, Danen_US
dc.contributor.authorAkhtar, Reeceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolding, Benjamin Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanatti, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorClaridge, Gordonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSadeh, Avien_US
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Nicola Len_US
dc.contributor.authorO’Leary, Rachaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaughan, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcAdams, Tom Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorRowe, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorEley, Thalia Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorViding, Essien_US
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Alice Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T16:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.citationDenis, D., R. Akhtar, B. C. Holding, C. Murray, J. Panatti, G. Claridge, A. Sadeh, et al. 2017. “Externalizing Behaviors and Callous-Unemotional Traits: Different Associations With Sleep Quality.” Sleep 40 (8): zsx070. doi:10.1093/sleep/zsx070. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsx070.en
dc.identifier.issnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35014927
dc.description.abstractAbstract Study Objectives Sleep quality is associated with different aspects of psychopathology, but relatively little research has examined links between sleep quality and externalizing behaviors or callous-unemotional traits. We examined: (1) whether an association exists between sleep quality and externalizing behaviors; (2) whether anxiety mediates this association; (3) whether callous-unemotional traits are associated with sleep quality. Methods: Data from two studies were used. Study 1 involved 1556 participants of the G1219 study aged 18–27 years (62% female). Questionnaire measures assessed sleep quality, anxiety, externalizing behaviors, and callous-unemotional traits. Study 2 involved 338 participants aged 18–66 years (65% female). Questionnaires measured sleep quality, externalizing behaviors, and callous-unemotional traits. In order to assess objective sleep quality, actigraphic data were also recorded for a week from a subsample of study 2 participants (n = 43). Results: In study 1, poorer sleep quality was associated with greater externalizing behaviors. This association was partially mediated by anxiety and moderated by levels of callous-unemotional traits. There was no significant relationship between sleep quality and callous-unemotional traits. In study 2, poorer sleep quality, as assessed via self-reported but not objective measures, was associated with higher levels of externalizing behaviors. Furthermore, in study 2, better sleep quality (indicated in both questionnaires and actigraphy measures: lower mean activity, and greater sleep efficiency) was associated with higher levels of callous-unemotional traits. Conclusions: Self-reports of poorer sleep quality are associated with externalizing behaviors, and this association is partially mediated by anxiety. Callous-unemotional traits are not associated with poor sleep and may even be related to better sleep quality. This is an exceptional finding given that poor sleep quality appears to be a characteristic of most psychopathology.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1093/sleep/zsx070en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5806541/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectactigraphyen
dc.subjectantisocialen
dc.subjectcallous-unemotionalen
dc.subjectexternalizingen
dc.subjectpsychopathologyen
dc.subjectsleepen
dc.titleExternalizing Behaviors and Callous-Unemotional Traits: Different Associations With Sleep Qualityen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalSleepen
dc.date.available2018-03-20T16:03:38Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sleep/zsx070*
dash.authorsorderedfalse


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