Disparities in cancer outcomes across age, sex, and race/ethnicity among patients with pancreatic cancer

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Disparities in cancer outcomes across age, sex, and race/ethnicity among patients with pancreatic cancer

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Title: Disparities in cancer outcomes across age, sex, and race/ethnicity among patients with pancreatic cancer
Author: Nipp, Ryan; Tramontano, Angela C.; Kong, Chung Yin; Pandharipande, Pari; Dowling, Emily C.; Schrag, Deborah; Hur, Chin

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Citation: Nipp, Ryan, Angela C. Tramontano, Chung Yin Kong, Pari Pandharipande, Emily C. Dowling, Deborah Schrag, and Chin Hur. 2018. “Disparities in cancer outcomes across age, sex, and race/ethnicity among patients with pancreatic cancer.” Cancer Medicine 7 (2): 525-535. doi:10.1002/cam4.1277. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.1277.
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Abstract: Abstract Age, sex, and racial/ethnic disparities exist, but are understudied in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database to determine whether survival and treatment disparities persist after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Our study included PDAC patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2011. We used Cox regression to compare survival across age, sex, and race/ethnicity within early‐stage and late‐stage cancer subgroups, adjusting for marital status, urban location, socioeconomics, SEER region, comorbidities, stage, lymph node status, tumor location, tumor grade, diagnosis year, and treatment received. We used logistic regression to compare differences in treatment received across age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Among 20,896 patients, 84% were White, 9% Black, 5% Asian, and 2% Hispanic. Median age was 75; 56% were female and 53% had late‐stage cancer. Among early‐stage patients in the adjusted Cox model, older patient subgroups had worse survival compared with ages 66–69 (HR > 1.1, P < 0.01 for groups >69); no survival differences existed between sexes. Black (HR = 1.1, P = 0.01) and Hispanic (HR = 1.2, P < 0.01) patients had worse survival compared with White. Among late‐stage cancer patients, patients over age 84 had worse survival than those aged 66–69 (HR = 1.1, P < 0.01), and males (HR = 1.08, P < 0.01) had worse survival than females; there were no racial/ethnic differences. Older age and minority race/ethnicity were associated with lower likelihood of receiving chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery. Age and racial/ethnic disparities in survival outcomes and treatment received exist for PDAC patients; these disparities persist after adjusting for differences in demographic and clinical characteristics.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/cam4.1277
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5806100/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35014931
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