Regulation of soluble neuropilin 1, an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, in liver development and regeneration

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Regulation of soluble neuropilin 1, an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, in liver development and regeneration

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Title: Regulation of soluble neuropilin 1, an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, in liver development and regeneration
Author: Panigrahy, Dipak; Adini, Irit; Mamluk, Roni; Levonyak, Nicholas; Bruns, Christiane J.; D'Amore, Patricia Ann; Klagsbrun, Michael; Bielenberg, Diane

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Citation: Panigrahy, Dipak, Irit Adini, Roni Mamluk, Nicholas Levonyak, Christiane J. Bruns, Patricia A. D’Amore, Michael Klagsbrun, and Diane R. Bielenberg. 2014. “Regulation of Soluble Neuropilin 1, an Endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitor, in Liver Development and Regeneration.” Pathology 46 (5) (August): 416–423. doi:10.1097/pat.0000000000000121.
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Abstract: Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). A soluble isoform of Nrp1 (sNrp1) has not been described in the mouse. Our goal was to examine the expression of mouse sNrp1 during liver development and regeneration. sNrp1 was cloned from mouse liver. The expression of sNrp1 and VEGF was examined in mouse liver during postnatal development and regeneration using northern blot, western blot, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemical analyses. HGF/NRP1 binding was examined in vitro. A novel 588-amino acid sNrp1 isoform was found to contain the ligand binding regions of Nrp1. The adult liver expressed more sNrp1 than full-length Nrp1. In vivo, hepatocytes constitutively expressed VEGF and sNrp1 in the quiescent state. sNrp1 was highly upregulated at P20, a time point coinciding with a plateau in liver and body weights. Following hepatectomy, endogenous levels of sNrp1 decreased during the rapid growth phase; and VEGF levels were highest just prior to and during the angiogenic phase. sNrp1 levels again rose 5-10 days post-hepatectomy, presumably to control regeneration. HGF protein bound NRP1 and binding was competed with sNRP1. We cloned a novel mouse sNrp1 isoform from liver and provide evidence that this endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor may regulate VEGF or HGF bioavailability during normal physiological growth and development as well as during liver regeneration.
Published Version: 10.1097/pat.0000000000000121
Other Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4642718/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35059710
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