Past, Current, and Future Trends in Infant Face Perception Research

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Past, Current, and Future Trends in Infant Face Perception Research

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Title: Past, Current, and Future Trends in Infant Face Perception Research
Author: Nelson, Charles A.; Ludemann, Pamela M.

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Citation: Nelson, Charles A., and Pamela M. Ludemann. 1989. Past, Current, and Future Trends in Infant Face Perception Research. Canadian Journal of Psychology/Revue Canadienne de Psychologie 43, no. 2: 183–198.
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Abstract: Our review of infant face perception research had three purposes. First, we briefly attempted to describe a number of themes prevalent in the literature before 1979. Although the themes were broad and difficult to identify clearly, the underlying issues of the time seemed to fit three headings: (a) research that either did or did not support the existence of an innate preference for faces, (b) research that explored infants' general knowledge of faces, particularly their sensitivity to the invariant properties of faces, and (c) how infants acquire information about faces, as demonstrated through studies of facial scanning and feature discrimination. Our second goal was to summarize current trends. Here emphasis was placed on studies concerned with the face as a conveyer of socially-salient information, the neurological basis of face perception, and recent methodological innovations. Our final goal was to provide a sampling of issues and questions that seemed appropriate for investigation during the next decade.
Published Version: doi:10.1037/h0084221
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35135974
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