The Ontogeny of Human Memory: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

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The Ontogeny of Human Memory: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

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Title: The Ontogeny of Human Memory: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective
Author: Nelson, Charles A.
Citation: Nelson, Charles A. 1995. The Ontogeny of Human Memory: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Developmental Psychology 31, no. 5: 723–738.
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Abstract: The relation between early memory development and corresponding changes in brain development is explored in this article. It is proposed that a form of preexplicit memory (dependent on the hippocampus) develops in the 1st few months. Between 8 and 12 mo, a more adultlike form of explicit memory emerges, which draws broadly on limbic and cortical structures. Two types of implicit memory also make their appearance in the 1st few months: procedural learning (dependent on striatal structures) and conditioning ( which may rely on the olivary-cerebellar complex and possibly the hippocampus). Finally, working memory (dependent on the prefrontal cortex and associated neural circuitry) is also present early in life, although the ability to use working memory when motoric ability is also required (e.g., reaching for hidden objects) has a protracted developmental course relative to other forms of memory.
Published Version: doi:10.1037/0012-1649.31.5.723
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35135984
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