High Level Object Recognition Without an Anterior Inferior Temporal Lobe

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High Level Object Recognition Without an Anterior Inferior Temporal Lobe

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Title: High Level Object Recognition Without an Anterior Inferior Temporal Lobe
Author: Biederman, Irving; Gerhardstein, Peter C.; Cooper, Eric E.; Nelson, Charles A.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Biederman, Irving, Peter C. Gerhardstein, Eric E. Cooper, and Charles A. Nelson. 1997. High Level Object Recognition Without an Anterior Inferior Temporal Lobe. Neuropsychologia 35, no. 3: 271–287.
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Abstract: Seven individuals with unilateral anterior inferior temporal (AIT) lobectomies performed two types of shape recognition tasks with line drawings of 3D objects briefy presented in either the left or the right visual field. In one task, subjects named familiar objects in a name priming paradigm. In the other task, subjects judged whether two objects, presented sequentially with an intervening mask, were the same or different in shape, disregarding differences in orientation of up to 60˚ in depth. They could not use names or basic level concepts to do the matching as the stimuli were either nonsense objects or, if familiar objects, were of same name -different-shaped exemplars on different trials. The disadvantage of presenting an image to the lobectomized hemisphere was negligible in both tasks. Two non-exclusive possibilities are suggested by this result: (a) Object recognition is completed posterior to AIT, likely at the temporal occipital boundary, with no deleterious retrograde effects on object recognition from the AIT section, or (b) Callosal transfer of object information prior to AIT is completely effcient. These results, along with results of single unit recording and lesion experiments in the monkey, PET and MRI imaging in humans, and a plausibility argument based on the pattern of callosal connections suggest both are correct. Rather than mediating real-time object recognition, AIT may code representations for visual episodes and scenes.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/S0028-3932(96)00075-9
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35135987
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