Mucin Expression in Gastric Cancer: Reappraisal of Its Clinicopathologic and Prognostic Significance

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Mucin Expression in Gastric Cancer: Reappraisal of Its Clinicopathologic and Prognostic Significance

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Title: Mucin Expression in Gastric Cancer: Reappraisal of Its Clinicopathologic and Prognostic Significance
Author: Kim, Dae Hyun; Shin, Nari; Kim, Gwang-Ho; Song, Geum Am; Jeon, Tae-Yong; Kim, Dong-Heon; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Park, Do Youn

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Citation: Kim, Dae Hwan, Nari Shin, Gwang Ha Kim, Geum Am Song, Tae-Yong Jeon, Dong-Heon Kim, Gregory Y. Lauwers, and Do Youn Park. 2013. Mucin expression in gastric cancer: reappraisal of its clinicopathologic and prognostic significance. Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine 137(8): 1047–1053.
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Abstract: CONTEXT:
The clinical validity of mucin expression in gastric cancer is debated. Whereas several reports demonstrate a correlation between mucin expression and prognosis, others deny such an association.
OBJECTIVES:
This survival analysis study aims to elucidate the prognostic significance of mucin expression in gastric cancer.
DESIGN:
A retrospective survival analysis was done with 412 cases of gastric cancer characterized on the basis of MUC immunohistochemistry using MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, and CD10 antibodies; the cases were divided into those with a gastric, an intestinal, or a null mucin phenotype based on the predominant mucin.
RESULTS:
There was no association between mucin expression and survival when considering overall gastric cancers or the advanced gastric cancer subtype. However, early gastric cancers with a gastric mucin phenotype showed longer survival than those with an intestinal mucin phenotype (P = .01) or a null phenotype (P = .01). In particular, MUC5AC-positive early gastric cancers resulted in longer survival than did those that did not express MUC5AC (P = .009). The loss of MUC5AC expression was identified as an independent, poor prognostic factor in early gastric cancers using the Cox regression proportional hazard model (hazard ratio, 3.50; P = .045).
CONCLUSIONS:
MUC5AC expression is significantly associated with patient survival and can be used to predict outcomes in the gastric cancers, especially in the early gastric cancers.
Published Version: doi:10.5858/arpa.2012-0193-OA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35136020
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