Interest in spiritually integrated psychotherapy among acute psychiatric patients.

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Interest in spiritually integrated psychotherapy among acute psychiatric patients.

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Interest in spiritually integrated psychotherapy among acute psychiatric patients.
Author: Rosmarin, David Hillel; Forester, Brent Peter; Shassian, Daniel M.; Webb, Christian A; Bjorgvinsson, Throstur

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Rosmarin, David H., Brent P. Forester, Daniel M. Shassian, Christian A. Webb, and Thröstur Björgvinsson. 2015. “Interest in Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy Among Acute Psychiatric Patients.” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 83 (6): 1149–1153. doi:10.1037/ccp0000046.
Access Status: Full text of the requested work is not available in DASH at this time (“dark deposit”). For more information on dark deposits, see our FAQ.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Objective: Spiritually integrated psychotherapy (SIP) is increasingly common, though systematic assessment of interest in such treatments, and predictors of such interest, has not yet been conducted among acute psychiatric patients. Methods: We conducted a survey with 253 acute psychiatric patients (95–99% response rate) at a private psychiatric hospital in Eastern Massachusetts to assess for interest in SIP, religious affiliation, and general spiritual or religious involvement alongside clinical and demographic factors. Results: More than half (58.2%) of patients reported “fairly” or greater interest in SIP, and 17.4% reported “very much” interest. Demographic and clinical factors were not significant predictors except that current depression predicted greater interest. Religious affiliation and general spiritual or religious involvement were associated with more interest; however, many affiliated patients reported low or no interest (42%), and conversely many unaffiliated patients reported “fairly” or greater interest (37%). Conclusions: Many acute psychiatric patients, particularly individuals with major depression, report interest in integrating spirituality into their mental health care. Assessment of interest in SIP should be considered in the context of clinical care.
Published Version: doi:10.1037/ccp0000046
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35646711
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters