Adaptive metalenses with simultaneous electrical control of focal length, astigmatism, and shift

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Adaptive metalenses with simultaneous electrical control of focal length, astigmatism, and shift

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Title: Adaptive metalenses with simultaneous electrical control of focal length, astigmatism, and shift
Author: She, Alan; Zhang, Shuyan; Shian, Samuel; Clarke, David R.; Capasso, Federico

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: She, Alan, Shuyan Zhang, Samuel Shian, David R. Clarke, and Federico Capasso. 2018. “Adaptive metalenses with simultaneous electrical control of focal length, astigmatism, and shift.” Science Advances 4 (2): eaap9957. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aap9957. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aap9957.
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Abstract: Focal adjustment and zooming are universal features of cameras and advanced optical systems. Such tuning is usually performed longitudinally along the optical axis by mechanical or electrical control of focal length. However, the recent advent of ultrathin planar lenses based on metasurfaces (metalenses), which opens the door to future drastic miniaturization of mobile devices such as cell phones and wearable displays, mandates fundamentally different forms of tuning based on lateral motion rather than longitudinal motion. Theory shows that the strain field of a metalens substrate can be directly mapped into the outgoing optical wavefront to achieve large diffraction-limited focal length tuning and control of aberrations. We demonstrate electrically tunable large-area metalenses controlled by artificial muscles capable of simultaneously performing focal length tuning (>100%) as well as on-the-fly astigmatism and image shift corrections, which until now were only possible in electron optics. The device thickness is only 30 μm. Our results demonstrate the possibility of future optical microscopes that fully operate electronically, as well as compact optical systems that use the principles of adaptive optics to correct many orders of aberrations simultaneously.
Published Version: doi:10.1126/sciadv.aap9957
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5834009/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:35982508
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