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dc.contributor.authorUllman, Michael T.
dc.contributor.authorCorkin, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorCoppola, Marie
dc.contributor.authorHickok, Gregory
dc.contributor.authorGrowdon, John Herbert
dc.contributor.authorKoroshetz, Walter J.
dc.contributor.authorPinker, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-29T14:16:20Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationUllman, Michael T., Suzanne Corkin, Marie Coppola, Gregory Hickok, John H. Growdon, Walter J. Koroshetz, and Steven Pinker. 1997. A neural dissociation within language: Evidence that the mental dictionary is part of declarative memory, and that grammatical rules are processed by the procedural system. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 9(2): 266-276.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0898-929Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3600798
dc.description.abstractLanguage comprises a lexicon for storing words and a grammar for generating rule-governed forms. Evidence is presented that the lexicon is part of a temporal-parietalhnedial-temporal “declarative memory” system and that granlmatical rules are processed by a frontamasal-ganglia “procedural” system. Patients produced past tenses of regular and novel verbs (looked and plagged), which require an -ed-suffixation rule, and irregular verbs (dug), which are retrieved from memory. Word-finding difficulties in posterior aphasia, and the general declarative memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease, led to more errors with irregular than regular and novel verbs. Grammatical difficulties in anterior aphasia, and the general impairment of procedures in Parkinson's disease, led to the opposite pattern. In contrast to the Parkinson's patients, who showed suppressed motor activity and rule use, Huntington's disease patients showed excess motor activity and rule use, underscoring a role for the basal ganglia in grammatical processing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPsychologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1162/jocn.1997.9.2.266en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleA Neural Dissociation Within Language: Evidence that the Mental Dictionary is Part of Declarative Memory, and that Grammatical Rules are Processed by the Procedural Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorPinker, Steven
dc.date.available2010-01-29T14:16:20Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn.1997.9.2.266*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGrowdon, John
dash.contributor.affiliatedPinker, Steven


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