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dc.contributor.authorGandevani, Ariana
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-11T11:52:02Z
dc.date.created2020-03
dc.date.issued2020-01-24
dc.date.submitted2020
dc.identifier.citationGandevani, Ariana. 2020. Are Job Satisfaction and Life Satisfaction Higher When Employees' Jobs Match Their Cognitive Style?. Master's thesis, Harvard Extension School.
dc.identifier.urihttps://nrs.harvard.edu/URN-3:HUL.INSTREPOS:37364888*
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that field dependent and field independent people respond to their environments differently. Further, there have been several studies that document a lack of employee-job fit as a major reason for why people leave their jobs (Thompson, 1985). Studies have also suggested that employees seek a fit among their cognitive style, job preferences, and organizational characteristics (Armstrong et al., 2011), even if they are unaware that cognitive style is part of what is driving their decisions. Studies on cognitive style, initiated in the early 1950s, have aimed to identify individual differences in cognition that are stable in relation to the environment. Thus, the purpose of the present study is three-fold: (a) to investigate the relations among job/cognitive style match and the major outcome variables (two measures of job satisfaction, life satisfaction, three work environment dimensions); (b) to examine differences between those whose job characteristics and cognitive style match versus do not match on the major outcome variables; and (c) to assess differences between those with field independent versus field dependent cognitive style on the outcome variables. One hundred twenty-five volunteer workers completed surveys on cognitive style, work environment, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Results suggested that those with a match between job characteristics and cognitive style exhibit greater job satisfaction and life satisfaction. Findings also revealed that field dependent individuals experience greater job and life satisfaction than those with a field independent cognitive style. Finally, an interaction between cognitive style and job match indicated that those with field independent cognitive styles whose jobs match their style perceive more personal growth and goal orientation in their jobs than all other groups.
dc.description.sponsorshipPsychology
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectcognitive style
dc.subjectfield independent
dc.subjectfield dependent
dc.subjectjob satisfaction
dc.subjectlife satisfaction
dc.subjectwork environment
dc.titleAre Job Satisfaction and Life Satisfaction Higher When Employees' Jobs Match Their Cognitive Style?
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorGandevani, Ariana
dc.date.available2020-09-11T11:52:02Z
thesis.degree.date2020
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Extension School
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Extension School
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameALM
thesis.degree.nameALM
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDemick, Jack
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSpetter, Dante
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailarianagandevani@gmail.com


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