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dc.contributor.authorKim, Janice
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-11T16:02:31Z
dash.embargo.terms2022-05-01
dc.date.created2020-05
dc.date.issued2020-05-15
dc.date.submitted2020
dc.identifier.citationKim, Janice. 2020. Association of Human Plasma Metabolomics With Delayed Dark Adaptation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard Medical School.
dc.identifier.urihttps://nrs.harvard.edu/URN-3:HUL.INSTREPOS:37364988*
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To assess the association between plasma metabolomic profiles and dark adaptation (DA) in all stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: 56 AMD patients (14 early-stage AMD, 31 intermediate-stage AMD, 11late-stage AMD) and 19 control patients without any vitreoretinal disease were prospectively recruited from January 2015 to June 2016. Participants underwent profiling for metabolomes in fasting blood and urine samples through the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Nontargeted MS analysis was performed by Metabolon, Inc., using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem MS. For biological interpretation, pathway enrichment analysis of significant metabolites was performed using MetaboAnalyst. Subjects also obtained DA testing in both eyes with the AdaptDx (MacuLogix, Middletown, PA) DA extended protocol (20 minutes). Multivariate logistical regressions were performed using various metabolites as predictors for dark adaptation in AMD patients versus controls, while controlling for age. RESULTS: Multivariate logistical regressions between time to dark adapt (continuous variable, truncated at 20 minutes, limit of the test) and 544 general metabolites identified 1 significant metabolite, alpha-tocopherol (AT), as different between AMD patients and control patients. CONCLUSIONS: Participants with AMD may have altered levels of alpha tocopherol compared with controls that could potentially predict ability to dark adapt and supports oxidative stress as a pathogenic mechanism for AMD. CONCLUSIONS: Participants with AMD may have altered levels of alpha tocopherol compared with controls that could potentially predict ability to dark adapt and supports oxidative stress as a pathogenic mechanism for AMD.
dc.description.sponsorshipScholarly Project
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectAMD
dc.subjectophthalmology
dc.subjectdark adaptation
dc.titleAssociation of Human Plasma Metabolomics With Delayed Dark Adaptation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorKim, Janice
dash.embargo.until2022-05-01
dc.date.available2020-09-11T16:02:31Z
thesis.degree.date2020
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
dc.contributor.committeeMemberD'Amore, Patricia
dc.type.materialtext
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailjanicekim93@gmail.com


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