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dc.contributor.authorChoi, Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-02T16:02:20Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-03
dc.identifier.citationDanielle Narae Choi (2018) Juvenile Delinquents, Journal of Architectural Education, 72:2, 281-283, DOI: 10.1080/10464883.2018.1496734en_US
dc.identifier.issn1046-4883en_US
dc.identifier.issn1531-314Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nrs.harvard.edu/URN-3:HUL.INSTREPOS:37365487*
dc.description.abstractFrederick Law Olmsted’s Franklin Park hosts a small hillside population of American beech saplings. Though juvenile in form, these small trees may be many years old, waiting for the mature canopy to die. This “micro-narrative” uses this case to describe the dilemmas of landscape architectural preservation in the public realm. Strictly form-based approaches are inadequate to respond to changing human use; approaches grounded in restoration ecology suffer from a “crisis of baselines” in the face of ongoing environmental change. The tension between material authenticity and ecological resilience can be productively explored to seek new design potentials for preservation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.relationJournal of Architectural Educationen_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectVisual Arts and Performing Artsen_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.titleJuvenile Delinquentsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Architectural Educationen_US
dash.depositing.authorChoi, Danielle
dc.date.available2020-10-02T16:02:20Z
dash.affiliation.otherGraduate School of Designen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10464883.2018.1496734
dc.source.journalJournal of Architectural Education
dash.source.volume72;2
dash.source.page281-283
dash.contributor.affiliatedChoi, Danielle


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