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dc.contributor.advisorJeyifo, Biodun
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Vincent
dc.contributor.advisorOrtiz, Paul
dc.contributor.authorFardis, Armin
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-16T15:03:25Z
dash.embargo.terms2025-05-01
dc.date.created2020-05
dc.date.issued2020-05-14
dc.date.submitted2020
dc.identifier.citationFardis, Armin. 2020. Carceral Marronage and Mutations in Colonialism. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.
dc.identifier.urihttps://nrs.harvard.edu/URN-3:HUL.INSTREPOS:37366015*
dc.description.abstractWhile recent scholarship has addressed the question of what colonialism meant in terms of the experience of people who lived at the peripheries of empires, little consideration has been given to the question of what anticolonialism meant for the experience of people who lived in the ultimate peripheral zone: namely, prisons. Carceral Marronage and Mutations in Colonialism explores the intellectual history and poetics of carcerally-inflected anticolonialism, focusing on significant counter-cultural formations that emerged in Irish and American prisons in the 1960s and 70s. In focusing on oral histories and narratives of confinement by George Jackson, Huey Newton, and Bobby Sands, it tracks trajectories of intellectual self-fashioning in the context of what I identify as a global culture of carceral marronage. Overall, I argue that this culture is embodied by a paradox of escape in confinement, and that this paradox presents itself as both a mode of psychic discipline and of self-determined social organization.
dc.description.sponsorshipAfrican and African American Studies
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectPrisons, Confinement, Marronage, Maroons, Insurrection, Anticolonialism, Black Radical Tradition, Carcerality
dc.titleCarceral Marronage and Mutations in Colonialism
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorFardis, Armin
dash.embargo.until2025-05-01
dc.date.available2020-10-16T15:03:25Z
thesis.degree.date2020
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentAfrican and African American Studies
thesis.degree.departmentAfrican and African American Studies
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailarminfardis@gmail.com


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