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dc.contributor.authorHardt, Richard A.
dc.contributor.authorForman, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-22T16:40:12Z
dc.date.issued1989-10
dc.identifier.citationHardt, Richard A., Richard Forman. "Boundary Form Effects on Woody Colonization of Reclaimed Surface Mines." Ecology 70, no. 5 (1989): 1252-1260. DOI: 10.2307/1938183
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nrs.harvard.edu/URN-3:HUL.INSTREPOS:37373265*
dc.description.abstractWoody plants and evidence of browsing were measured on eight reclaimed strip mines in Maryland and West Virginia to see whether revegetation patterns differed adjacent to concave, straight, and convex forest boundaries. Two clonal species predom- inated (Rubus allegheniensis and Robinia pseudoacacia), followed in abundance by three wind-dispersed species (Fraxinus americana, Acer rubrum, Betula lenta), and a variety of animal-dispersed species. Mine transects adjacent to concave forest boundaries had 2.5 times as many colonizing stems as those next to convex boundaries. Stems of colonizing species extended > 61 m from concave boundaries, but rarely > 13 m from convex bound- aries. Stem density of all the common animal-dispersed species was correlated with their abundance in the adjacent forest edge, whereas no relationship existed for Robinia or the wind-dispersed species. Evidence of browsing was greater adjacent to concave boundaries than opposite convex boundaries. These strikingly different colonization patterns appear to be primarily the result of the immigration process interacting directly with shape as a spatial characteristic. Through time, a "concave-convex reversal" in boundary form is evident. This results from a "cove concentration effect" where the greatest boundary ex- pansion rate is in coves being colonized. Almost all patterns next to straight boundaries were intermediate between those opposite concave and convex boundaries. We conclude that boundary form may exert a powerful control over adjacent ecosystems in a landscape. This presents significant opportunities for planning and managing surface mines and other colonizing areas.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectEcology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematicsen_US
dc.titleBoundary Form Effects on Woody Colonization of Reclaimed Surface Minesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalEcologyen_US
dc.date.available2022-09-22T16:40:12Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/1938183
dash.source.volume70en_US
dash.source.page1252-1260en_US
dash.source.issue5en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedForman, Richard


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