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dc.contributor.authorBowles, Hannah Riley
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Francis
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T09:59:08Z
dc.date.issued2010-08
dc.identifier.citationBowles, Hannah Riley, and Flynn, Francis. "Gender and Persistence in Negotiation: A Dyadic Perspective.(Report)." Academy of Management Journal 53, no. 4 (2010): 769-787.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-4273en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37865891*
dc.description.abstractWe studied interactive effects of gender in negotiation dyads, theorizing that the degree and manner of a negotiator’s persistence are functions of the gender composition of the dyad. Our findings challenge sex-stereotypic perspectives, showing that women persist more with male naysayers than with female naysayers but do so in a stereotypically low-status (more indirect than direct) manner. Women’s adaptation of their persistence to naysayer gender appeared functional because increased persistence with male naysayers helped close a gender gap in performance, and female negotiators with high performance adjusted their manner of persistence more than those with low performance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Managementen_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectnegotiation in businessen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
dc.subjectsex rolesen_US
dc.subjectdyadic analysisen_US
dc.subjectadaptability (psychology)en_US
dc.subjectgender stereotypesen_US
dc.subjectperformanceen_US
dc.titleGender and Persistence in Negotiation: A Dyadic Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalAcademy of Management Journalen_US
dc.date.available2018-12-06T09:59:08Z
dash.affiliation.otherHarvard Kennedy Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5465/amj.2010.52814595
dc.source.journalAMJ
dash.source.volume53;4
dash.source.page769-787
dash.contributor.affiliatedBowles, Hannah Riley


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