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dc.contributor.authorNeas, L. M.
dc.contributor.authorBurge, H.
dc.contributor.authorKoutrakis, p.
dc.contributor.authorSpeizer, F. E.
dc.contributor.authorDockery, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-14T14:41:32Z
dc.date.issued1996-04-15
dc.identifier.citationNeas, L. M., D. W. Dockery, H. Burge, p. Koutrakis, and F. E. Speizer. 1996. “Fungus Spores, Air Pollutants, and Other Determinants of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Children.” American Journal of Epidemiology 143 (8): 797–807. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a008818.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_US
dc.identifier.issn1476-6256en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37989556*
dc.description.abstractThe impact of summertime haze episodes on daily variations in symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs) was examined in a study of 108 children living in State College, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1991. Twice daily, each child recorded symptoms, PEFRs, and hours spent outdoors. Environmental measurements included daily 12- and 24-hour averages for meteorologic and air pollutant variables and 24-hour average fungus spore concentrations. A 10,000-spore/m(3) increment in Cladosporium spore concentration was associated with a deficit in morning PEFR (-1.0 liters/minute, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.9 to -0.2). A 60-spore/m(3) increment in Epicoccum spore concentration was associated with increased incidence of morning cough (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.2) and a deficit in morning PEFR (-1.5 liters/minute, 95% CI -2.8 to -0.2). Fungi spore counts were not associated with respirable particle mass. A 125-nmol/m(3) increment in 12-hour daytime particle-strong acidity was associated with a deficit in evening PEFR (-0.5 liters/minute, 95% CI -1.2 to 0.2) and increased incidence of cold episodes that evening or the subsequent morning (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.61). A 20-mu g/m(3) increment in 24-hour respirable particles lagged by 24 hours was associated with a deficit in evening PEFR (-0.5 liters/minute, 95% CI -1.4 to 0.4) and increased incidence of cough episodes that evening or the subsequent morning (OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.13-1.66). These results confirm the acute effects of summertime particulate air pollution and suggest that aeroallergens have independent effects on respiratory symptoms and PEFR in children.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/143/8/797.full.pdfen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleFungus Spores, Air Pollutants, and Other Determinants of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorDockery, Douglas
dc.date.available2019-01-14T14:41:32Z
dash.workflow.comments1scienceen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a008818
dc.source.journalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
dash.source.volume143;8
dash.source.page797-807
dash.contributor.affiliatedDockery, Douglas


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