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dc.contributor.authorCárdenas, Mauricio
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-01T14:57:56Z
dc.date.issued2001-12
dc.identifier.citationCardenas, Mauricio. “Economic Growth in Colombia: A Reversal of 'Fortune'?” CID Working Paper Series 2001.83, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, December 2001.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:39612435*
dc.description.abstractColombia’s annual GDP growth fell to an average of 3% between 1980 and 2000 from 5% between 1950 and 1980. The sources-of-growth decomposition shows that this reversal can be accounted entirely by changes in productivity. Indeed, between 1960 and 1960 productivity gains increased output per capita by 1% per year. Since 1980, productivity losses have reduced output per capita at the same rate. The time series analysis suggests that the implosion of productivity is related to the increase in criminality which has diverted capital and labor to unproductive activities. In turn, the rise in crime has been the result of rapid expansion in drug-trafficking activities, which erupted around 1980. This explanation is supported by cross-country evidence that shows that Colombia is clear outlier in terms of conflict and fragmentation, and suggests that high crime is associated with low productivity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCenter for International Development at Harvard Universityen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/cid/publicationsen_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleEconomic Growth in Colombia: A Reversal of 'Fortune'?en_US
dc.typeResearch Paper or Reporten_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalCID Working Paper Seriesen_US
dc.date.available2019-05-01T14:57:56Z


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