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dc.contributor.advisorLukin, Mikhail
dc.contributor.authorGoldman, Michael Lurie
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T14:17:35Z
dc.date.created2017-11
dc.date.issued2017-09-07
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:39987972*
dc.description.abstractThe nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has emerged as a versatile atom-like system, finding diverse applications at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the NV center's spin-triplet electronic ground state has a long coherence time and can be read out and initialized using nonresonant optical excitation, which has enabled a wide range of metrology and quantum information applications. At cryogenic temperatures, the NV center exhibits a variety of narrow, atom-like optical transitions, which has made the NV center a promising platform for quantum optics applications. We use coherent optical manipulation of the NV center at cryogenic temperatures to probe its internal dynamics and aspects of its interactions with its environment. First, we investigate the intersystem crossing (ISC) process, which is a spin-dependent nonradiative decay mechanism that enables the electronic spin state to be optically initialized and read out at room temperature. We measure the ISC rates from different excited states as well as the rate at which interactions with phonons redistribute population between these states. Based on these measurements, we develop a theoretical model that unifies the phonon-induced mixing and ISC mechanisms. We find that our model is in excellent agreement with experiment and that it can be used to predict unknown elements of the NV center's electronic structure. Second, we investigate a novel method of using coherent optical manipulation of the NV center's electronic spin to control a nearby nuclear spin. Coherent interactions between the NV center and nearby nuclear spins have enabled the development of NV center-based, multi-qubit quantum registers, but these techniques have generally required the application of microwave or radio-frequency radiation. We demonstrate control of the nuclear spin using an all-optical Raman technique and theoretically evaluate the extent to which the intrinsic physics of the NV center limits the coherence of this Raman-based manipulation technique.
dc.description.sponsorshipPhysics
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectPhysics, Atomic
dc.titleCoherent Optical Control of Atom-Like Defects in Diamond: Probing Internal Dynamics and Environmental Interactions
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorGoldman, Michael Lurie
dc.date.available2019-05-17T14:17:35Z
thesis.degree.date2017
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDoyle, John
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWalsworth, Ron
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentPhysics
dash.identifier.vireohttp://etds.lib.harvard.edu/gsas/admin/view/1854
dc.description.keywordsNitrogen-Vacancy center; quantum optics
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3879-9869
dash.author.emailmgoldman525@gmail.com


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