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dc.contributor.authorWeems, John A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-24T10:46:03Z
dash.embargo.terms2018-05-01
dc.date.created2016-05
dc.date.issued2019-03-28
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationWeems, John A. 2016. Feasibility and Evaluation of a Pilot Buprenorphine Training for Medical Students. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard Medical School.
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40620216*
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Morbidity and Mortality associated with opioid addiction is climbing in the US. Physicians’ inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward addicted patients remain significant barriers to treatment. We hypothesize that a buprenorphine training for medical students will be associated with an increase in knowledge of buprenorphine administration, more favorable attitudes toward addicted patients, and enhanced intention to treat addicted patients in future practice. Methods: A cohort of 19 Harvard medical students completed a buprenorphine waiver training and completed pre- and post-training surveys. A convenience sample of 34 who did not sign up for the training completed identical surveys. Attitudes, intentions, and beliefs were assessed by 29-item instrument scored on a 7-point Likert scale. Knowledge of buprenorphine administration was assessed by multiple choice exam. Results: Trainee and control groups had similar demographic compositions. Trainees showed significant improvement in sum scores on an 11-item exam (7.44. vs. 9.9 p= 0.0001). At baseline, trainees expressed stronger intentions to prescribe buprenorphine and more favorable attitudes towards patients with opioid use disorder than controls. Completion of the course was associated with enhanced favorable attitudes, intentions, and confidence to treat opioid addicted patients. Conclusions: Our results indicate that a pilot buprenorphine training for medical students increased knowledge of buprenorphine administration and enhanced favorable attitudes towards opioid addicted patients, attitudes toward buprenorphine treatment, intentions to treat in future practice, and confidence in treating patients with opioid use disorder. Training in buprenorphine administration in medical school may lower barriers to the provision of buprenorphine in the United States.
dc.description.sponsorshipScholarly Project
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectBuprenorpine
dc.subjectAddiction
dc.subjectSubstance Use Disorder
dc.subjectMedical Education
dc.subjectOpioid Addiction
dc.titleFeasibility and Evaluation of a Pilot Buprenorphine Training for Medical Students
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorWeems, John A.
dash.embargo.until2018-05-01
dc.date.available2019-06-24T10:46:03Z
thesis.degree.date2016
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
dc.type.materialtext
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.title.page1
dash.author.emailjohnaweems@gmail.com


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