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dc.contributor.authorKrieger, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorKosheleva, Anna
dc.contributor.authorWaterman, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jarvis
dc.contributor.authorBeckfield, Jason
dc.contributor.authorKiang, Mathew V
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-17T14:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-16
dc.identifier.citationKrieger, Nancy, Anna Kosheleva, Pamela D. Waterman, Jarvis T. Chen, Jason Beckfield, and Mathew V. Kiang. 2014. "50-year trends in US socioeconomic inequalities in health: US-born Black and White Americans, 1959–2008." International Journal of Epidemiology 43, no. 4: 1294–1313.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-3685en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40934198*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Debates exist over whether health inequities are bound to rise as population health improves, due to health improving more quickly among the better off, with most analyses focused on mortality data. Methods: We analysed 50 years of socioeconomic inequities in measured health status among US-born Black and White Americans, using data from the National Health Examination Surveys (NHES) I-III (1959–70), National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) I-III (1971–94) and NHANES 1999–2008. Results: Absolute US socioeconomic health inequities for income percentile and education variously decreased (serum cholesterol; childhood height), stagnated [systolic blood pressure (SBP)], widened [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC)] and in some cases reversed (age at menarche), even as on-average values rose (BMI, WC), idled (childhood height) and fell (SBP, serum cholesterol, age at menarche), with patterns often varying by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic measure; similar results occurred for relative inequities. For example, for WC, the adverse 20th (low) vs 80th (high) income percentile gap increased only among Whites (NHES I: 0.71 cm [95% confidence interval (CI) −0.74, 2.16); NHANES 2005–08: 2.10 (95% CI 0.96, 3.62)]. By contrast, age at menarche for girls in the 20th vs 80th income percentile among Black girls remained consistently lower, by 0.34 years (95% CI 0.12, 0.55) whereas among White girls the initial null difference became inverse [NHANES 2005–08: −0.49 years (95% CI −0.86, −0.12; overall P = 0.0015)]. Adjusting for socioeconomic position only modestly altered Black/White health inequities. Conclusions: Health inequities need not rise as population health improves.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://scholar.harvard.edu/jbeckfield/publicationsen_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4121555/en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectSocial inequalities in healthen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomicen_US
dc.subjectsecular trenden_US
dc.subjectNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) - USen_US
dc.subjectNational Health Examination Survey (NHES) - USen_US
dc.subjectrace/ethnicityen_US
dc.title50-year trends in US socioeconomic inequalities in health: US-born Black and White Americans, 1959–2008en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorKrieger, Nancy
dc.date.available2019-07-17T14:31:07Z
dash.affiliation.otherHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public Healthen_US
dash.funder.nameNational Institutes of Healthen_US
dash.funder.nameNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)en_US
dash.funder.award1 R21 HD060828en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dyu047
dc.source.journalInt. J. Epidemiol.
dash.source.volume43;4
dash.source.page1294-1313
dash.contributor.affiliatedKosheleva, Anna
dash.contributor.affiliatedKrieger, Nancy
dash.contributor.affiliatedWaterman, Pamela
dash.contributor.affiliatedBeckfield, Jason
dash.contributor.affiliatedChen, Jarvis


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