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dc.contributor.advisorDennerlein, Jack T.
dc.contributor.authorCoppola, Sarah Marie
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-19T15:03:04Z
dash.embargo.terms2020-05-01
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-04-26
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.citationCoppola, Sarah Marie. 2019. Upper Extremity Biomechanics and Gender: The Effects of Modern Computing Technologies. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40976812*
dc.description.abstractStatement of problem: Modern computing devices are often designed for a one size fits all approach, and consumers purchase devices based off of technical specifications rather than whether the devices fit them. These devices are often designed for men, and they require different postures, techniques, and levels of functional strength from women. Female sex/gender is associated with higher risks of upper extremity repetitive injury, which may be caused by both physiological and the psychosocial sex/gender differences as well as increased biomechanical exposure. Methods: Short key travel mobile computers, touchscreen tablet computers, and traditional desktop workstations were investigated for sex/gender exposure bias. This dissertation utilized direct and indirect measures including electromyography, typing force, joint movement, and self-reported questionnaires to analyze modern technologies’ effects on female and male participants. Small key travel mobile computers, touchscreen tablet computers, and traditional desktop workstations were investigated for sex/gender exposure bias. Results: A typing study with four short travel keyboards showed that female participants are more affected by different key switch designs than male participants. A touchscreen thumb swiping study revealed that male and female participants were differently affected by tablet orientation but similarly affected by tablet size, swipe location, and swipe direction. An observational study with office workers showed that female participants used more significantly more forearm muscle activity and applied typing forces than male participants. Conclusion: The results from the three studies suggest that there is a sex/gender bias in biomechanical exposures when using modern technology. These results demonstrate the need to include both genders in usability testing for mobile technology and to consider individual differences when designing technologies.
dc.description.sponsorshipEnvironmental Health
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectErgonomics
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectsex
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectoccupational health
dc.subjecttechnology
dc.subjecttablet
dc.subjectnotebook computer
dc.subjectmobile computing
dc.subjecthuman-computer interaction
dc.titleUpper Extremity Biomechanics and Gender: The Effects of Modern Computing Technologies
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorCoppola, Sarah Marie
dash.embargo.until2020-05-01
dc.date.available2019-07-19T15:03:04Z
thesis.degree.date2019
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Science (SD)
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Science (SD)
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLombardi, David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCatalano, Paul
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentEnvironmental Health
thesis.degree.departmentEnvironmental Health
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.title.page3
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3516-4382
dash.author.emailsarahmariecoppola@gmail.com


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