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dc.contributor.advisorStavins, Robert N.
dc.contributor.advisorPakes, Ariel
dc.contributor.advisorKalouptsidi, Myrto
dc.contributor.advisorAldy, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorGerarden, Todd Davis
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-08T13:20:43Z
dash.embargo.terms2020-05-01
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issued2018-05-08
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationGerarden, Todd Davis. 2018. Essays in Environmental Economics and Industrial Organization. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41129191*
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of three essays at the intersection of environmental economics and industrial organization. The common theme is the use of empirical economic analysis to evaluate government policy affecting renewable energy industries. In Chapter 1, I analyze the impacts of consumer subsidies in the global market for solar panels, accounting for short-run and long-run responses by consumers and firms. I quantify these responses by estimating a dynamic structural model of competition among solar panel manufacturers. I focus on one margin of innovation by firms and find that long-run supply responses are economically important, and that subsidies to consumers in one market generate spillovers to other markets through the innovative responses of firms, which are active in multiple markets. In Chapter 2, I study the impacts of trade policy on the market for solar panels. I use the synthetic control method and a structural model of the solar panel market to quantify the impact of duties imposed on solar panels imported into the United States, and to highlight the environmental implications of these trade policies. Finally, in Chapter 3, I exploit a natural experiment to examine the choice between subsidizing investment or output to promote wind electricity production. Using regression discontinuity and matching estimators, I find that output subsidies lead wind farms to produce more electricity than investment subsidies. As a result, output subsidies are likely to be more cost-effective than investment subsidies in this context.
dc.description.sponsorshipPublic Policy
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectAlternative Energy Sources
dc.subjectGovernment Policy
dc.subjectTechnological Change
dc.subjectEnergy Subsidies
dc.subjectInstrument Choice
dc.titleEssays in Environmental Economics and Industrial Organization
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorGerarden, Todd Davis
dash.embargo.until2020-05-01
dc.date.available2019-08-08T13:20:43Z
thesis.degree.date2018
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentPublic Policy
thesis.degree.departmentPublic Policy
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailtgerarden@gmail.com


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