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dc.contributor.authorAppleton, Allison A.
dc.contributor.authorBuka, Stephen L.
dc.contributor.authorLoucks, Eric B.
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Laurie T.
dc.contributor.authorKubzansky, Laura D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-25T13:31:28Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationAppleton, Allison A., Stephen L. Buka, Eric B. Loucks, Eric B. Rimm, Laurie T. Martin, and Laura D. Kubzansky. 2013. “A Prospective Study of Positive Early-Life Psychosocial Factors and Favorable Cardiovascular Risk in Adulthood.” Circulation 127 (8): 905–12. https://doi.org/10.1161/circulationaha.112.115782.
dc.identifier.issn0009-7322
dc.identifier.issn0069-4193
dc.identifier.issn1524-4539
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41245542*
dc.description.abstractBackground-The American Heart Association's national goals for cardiovascular health promotion emphasize that cardiovascular risk originates early in life, but little is known about childhood factors that may increase the likelihood of having a favorable cardiovascular risk (FCR) in adulthood. We examined the prospective association between positive childhood factors and the likelihood of midlife FCR. We also considered pathways through which childhood factors may influence FCR.Methods and Results-We studied 415 adults (mean age=42.2 years) of the Collaborative Perinatal Project, a national cohort initiated in 1959 to 1966. We examined 3 positive childhood factors assessed at age 7 years: attention regulation (ability to stay focused), cognitive ability, and positive home environment. Of these adults, 10.6% had FCR in midlife. Adjusting for demographics and childhood cardiovascular health, a 1-unit increase in childhood attention regulation, cognitive ability, and positive home environment was associated with 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.7), 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.9), and 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) higher respective odds of having midlife FCR. The association with childhood attention regulation was maintained when accounting for adulthood factors; education and diet in part explained the associations with childhood cognitive ability and home environment. The effect of each attribute was additive as those with high levels of each childhood factor had 4.3 higher odds (95% confidence interval, 1.01-18.2) of midlife FCR in comparison with those low in all factors.Conclusions-Positive childhood psychosocial factors may promote healthy adult cardiovascular functioning. Primordial prevention efforts aimed at preventing the development of cardiovascular risk should consider building on childhood psychosocial resources. (Circulation. 2013; 127: 905-912.)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Heart Association
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleA prospective study of positive early life psychosocial factors and favorable cardiovascular risk in adulthood
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalCirculation
dash.depositing.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.date.available2019-08-25T13:31:28Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 26096
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.115782
dash.source.volume127;8
dash.source.page905


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