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dc.contributor.authorCohen, Juliana F. W.
dc.contributor.authorRifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.contributor.authorOken, Emily
dc.contributor.authorGillman, Matthew W.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T13:59:28Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationCohen, Juliana FW, Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman, Eric B Rimm, Emily Oken, and Matthew W Gillman. 2011. “Maternal Trans Fatty Acid Intake and Fetal Growth.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 94 (5): 1241–47. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.111.014530.
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165
dc.identifier.issn1938-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41246923*
dc.description.abstractBackground: It is unclear from previous studies whether total or common subtypes of trans fatty acids are associated with fetal growth. Objective: We examined associations of maternal trans fatty acid intake during pregnancy with fetal growth. Design: We studied 1369 mother-child pairs participating in Project Viva-a prospective cohort study of pregnant women and their offspring. We assessed trans fatty acid consumption by using a validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire in each of the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. We estimated fetal growth as the birth-weight-for-gestational-age (BW/GA) z value in infants born at term. Results: We observed no associations of first-trimester trans fatty acid consumption with fetal growth. In the second trimester, the estimated mean (+/-SD) total trans fatty acid intake was 2.35 +/- 1.07 g/d, of which 0.11 g was 16: 1(n27t), 1.78 g was 18: 1 (n-9t), 0.13 g was 18: 2(n-6tt), 0.33 g was 18: 2(n-6tc), and 0.12 g was 18: 2(n-6ct). The mean (6SD) BW/GA was 0.24 +/- 0.95 z score units. Total trans fatty acid consumption during the second trimester was positively associated with the fetal growth z score (0.29 units; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.51 units) for each 1% increment in energy from trans fatty acids as a replacement for carbohydrates. The associations were limited to the trans fatty acids 16:1t (0.12 units; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.22 units) and 18: 2tc (0.53 units; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.96 units). Conclusion: A higher maternal intake of trans fatty acids, especially 16: 1t and 18: 2tc, during the second trimester of pregnancy was associated with greater fetal growth. Am J Clin Nutr 2011;94:1241-7.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleMaternal trans fatty acid intake and fetal growth
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dash.depositing.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.date.available2019-08-26T13:59:28Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 7135
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/ajcn.111.014530
dash.source.volume94;5
dash.source.page1241


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