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dc.contributor.authorHu, Frank B.
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.contributor.authorSmith-Warner, Stephanie A.
dc.contributor.authorFeskanich, Diane
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorAscherio, Albert
dc.contributor.authorSampson, Laura
dc.contributor.authorWillett, Walter C.::94559ea206eef8a8844fc5b80654fa5b::600
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T16:11:42Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationKhani, Bahram Rashid, Weimin Ye, Paul Terry, and Alicja Wolk. 2004. “Reproducibility and Validity of Major Dietary Patterns among Swedish Women Assessed with a Food-Frequency Questionnaire.” The Journal of Nutrition 134 (6): 1541–45. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/134.6.1541.
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165
dc.identifier.issn1938-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41249201*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recently, the analysis of dietary patterns has emerged as a possible approach to examining diet-disease relations. Objective: We examined the reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns defined by factor analysis using dietary data collected with a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Design: We enrolled a subsample of men (n = 127) from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study in a diet-validation study in 1986. A 131-item FFQ was administered twice, 1 y apart, and two l-wk diet records and blood samples were collected during this 1-y interval. Results: Using factor analysis, we identified 2 major eating patterns, which were qualitatively similar across the 2 FFQs and the diet records, The first factor, the prudent dietary pattern, was characterized by a high intake of vegetables, fruit, legumes, whole grains, and fish and other seafood, whereas the second factor, the Western pattern, was characterized by a high intake of processed meat, red meat, butter, high-fat dairy products, eggs, and refined grains. The reliability correlations for the factor scores between the 2 FFQs were 0.70 for the prudent pattern and 0.67 for the Western pattern. The correlations (corrected for week-to-week variation in diet records) between the 2 FFQs and diet records ranged from 0.45 to 0.74 for the 2 patterns. In addition, the correlations between the factor scores and nutrient intakes and plasma concentrations of biomarkers were in the expected direction. Conclusions: These data indicate reasonable reproducibility and validity of the major dietary patterns defined by factor analysis with data from an FFQ.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleReproducibility and validity of dietary patterns assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dash.depositing.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.date.available2019-08-26T16:11:42Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 1465
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jn/134.6.1541
dash.source.volume69;2
dash.source.page243-249
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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