Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJoshipura, Kaumudi J.
dc.contributor.authorHung, Hsin-Chia
dc.contributor.authorLi, Tricia Y.
dc.contributor.authorHu, Frank B.
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorColditz, Graham
dc.contributor.authorWillett, Walter C.::94559ea206eef8a8844fc5b80654fa5b::600
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-27T18:05:41Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJoshipura, Kaumudi J, Hsin-Chia Hung, Tricia Y Li, Frank B Hu, Eric B Rimm, Meir J Stampfer, Graham Colditz, and Walter C Willett. 2009. “Intakes of Fruits, Vegetables and Carbohydrate and the Risk of CVD.” Public Health Nutrition 12 (1): 115–21. https://doi.org/10.1017/s1368980008002036.
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.issn1475-2727
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41263056*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Low-carbohydrate diets could lead to reduced fruit and vegetable intake, which may Ire protective against CVD. The role of carbohydrate intake in modifying the association between fruits and vegetables and CVD has not been evaluated. Objective: To evaluate whether carbohydrate intake affects the association between fruits and vegetables and CVD. Design: We included participants from two large prospective studies, the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS). We followed 70 870 eligible NHS females for 16 years and 38 918 eligible HPFS males for 14 years. Diet was assessed from an FFQ updated every 4 years. Our primary outcome was ischaemic CVD (fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke). We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the relationship between fruits and vegetables and ischaemic CVD within groups with low, moderate or high carbohydrate intake. Results: Fruit intake was strongly related with carbohydrate intake, but vegetables showed a very small correlation. Vegetable intake showed stronger associations with ischaemic CVD among the low carbohydrate group (multivariate risk ratio (RR) = 0.82 for an increment of 3 servings/d; 95 % CI 0.68, 0.99); green leafy vegetables and carotene-rich fruits and vegetables followed a similar pattern. Total fruit. intake was associated with a lower risk of ischaemic CVD only among participants with moderate carbohydrate intake (RR = 0.81 comparing extreme quintiles; 95% CI 0.70, 0.94). Conclusions: Total vegetables, green leafy vegetables and carotene-rich fruits and vegetables showed stronger associations with ischaemic CVD among the low carbohydrate group. No consistent trends were observed for fruit intake.
dc.language.isoen_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleIntakes of fruits, vegetables and carbohydrate and the risk of CVD
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalPublic Health Nutrition
dash.depositing.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.date.available2019-08-27T18:05:41Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 91571
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980008002036
dash.source.volume12;1
dash.source.page115
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record