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dc.contributor.authorFarvid, Maryam
dc.contributor.authorQi, Lu
dc.contributor.authorHu, Frank
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, Ichiro
dc.contributor.authorOkereke, Olivia
dc.contributor.authorKubzansky, Laura
dc.contributor.authorWillett, Walter C.::94559ea206eef8a8844fc5b80654fa5b::600
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-29T04:44:49Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationFarvid, Maryam S., Lu Qi, Frank B. Hu, Ichiro Kawachi, Olivia I. Okereke, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Walter C. Willett. 2014. “Phobic Anxiety Symptom Scores and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women.” Brain, Behavior, and Immunity 36 (February): 176–82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2013.10.025.
dc.identifier.issn0889-1591
dc.identifier.issn1090-2139
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41275529*
dc.description.abstractContext: Emotional stress may be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the relation between phobic anxiety symptoms and risk of T2D is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate prospectively the association between phobic anxiety symptoms and incident T2D in three cohorts of US men and women. Design, setting and patients: We followed 30,791 men in the Health Professional's Follow-Up Study (HPFS) (1988-2008), 68,904 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (1988-2008), and 79,960 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II) (1993-2011). Phobic anxiety symptom scores, as measured by the Crown-Crisp index (CCI), calculated from 8 questions, were administered at baseline and updated in 2004 for NHS, in 2005 for NHS II, and in 2000 for HPFS. Incident T2D was confirmed by a validated supplementary questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards analysis to evaluate associations with incident T2D. Results: During 3,099,651 person-years of follow-up, we documented 12,831 incident T2D cases. In multivariate Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for major lifestyle and dietary risk factors, the hazard ratios (HRs) of T2D across categories of increasing levels of CCI (scores = 2 to <3, 3 to <4, 4 to <6, 6), compared with a score of <2, were increased significantly by 6%, 10%, 10% and 13% (P-trend = 0.001) for NHS; and by 19%, 11%, 21%, and 29% (P-trend < 0.0001) for NHS II. Each score increment in CCI was associated with 2% higher risk of T2D in NHS (HRs, 1.02, 95% confidence intervals: 1.01-1.03) and 4% higher risk of T2D in NHS II (HRs, 1.04, 95% confidence intervals: 1.02-1.05). Further adjustment for depression did not change the results. In HPFS, the association between CCI and T2D was not significant after adjusting for lifestyle variables. Conclusion: Our results suggest that higher phobic anxiety symptoms are associated with an increased risk of T2D in women.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisher
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titlePhobic anxiety symptom scores and incidence of type 2 diabetes in US men and women
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
dash.depositing.authorKawachi, Ichiro::3b17e788dad605ac69e3dd457b6c41ac::600
dc.date.available2019-08-29T04:44:49Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 15257
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbi.2013.10.025
dash.source.volume36
dash.source.page176


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