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dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T07:00:35Z
dc.identifier.citationMcCormick, Melissa. 2017. Purple Displaces Crimson: The Wakan Dialectic as Polemic. In Around Chigusa: Tea and the Arts of Sixteenth-Century Japan, edited by Dora C.Y. Ching, Louise Allison Cort, Andrew M. Watsky, 181-120. Princeton: Princeton University Press.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0691177554en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780691177557en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41288107*
dc.description.abstractThe cultural phenomenon known as wakan, the creative juxtaposition of Japanese (wa) and Chinese (kan) elements, can be difficult to articulate given the ambiguity involved in defining the boundaries of what makes something Chinese or Japanese, especially over time, or according to the unique perspectives of any given individual. Even at the seemingly irreducible level of language, the apposition of logographs expressing Chinese poems (kanshi), for example, and syllabic kana script expressing Japanese waka poems are not without nuances that render them fluid, interdependent, and aesthetically unified.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEast Asian Languages and Civilizationsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPrinceton University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://press.princeton.edu/titles/11121.htmlen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titlePurple Displaces Crimson: The Wakan Dialectic as Polemicen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dash.depositing.authorMcCormick, Melissa
dc.date.available2019-08-30T07:00:35Z
dc.relation.bookAround Chigusa : Tea and the Arts of Sixteenth-Century Japanen_US
dash.workflow.commentsFAR2017en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedMcCormick, Melissa


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