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dc.contributor.authorOka, Masayoshi
dc.contributor.authorLink, Carol
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, Ichiro
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T11:19:54Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationOka, Masayoshi, Carol L. Link, and Ichiro Kawachi. 2011. “Disparities in the Prevalence of Obesity in Boston: Results from the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey.” Public Health Reports 126 (5): 700–707. https://doi.org/10.1177/003335491112600512.
dc.identifier.issn0033-3549
dc.identifier.issn1468-2877
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41288266*
dc.description.abstractObjective. This study examined disparities in the prevalence of obesity to determine how future prevention and/or intervention efforts should be developed to remedy obesity.Methods. We obtained individual information of sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, and lifestyle behaviors from the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) survey for 2002-2005. To account for the complex BACH sampling design, observations were weighted inversely to their probability of selection, and sampling weights were poststratified to the Boston population from the U.S. Census 2000. We tested all possible two- and three-way interaction terms from a multivariate logistic regression model.Results. After controlling for individual determinants in detail and focusing on the population within a single city, the associations of sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, and lifestyle behaviors with obesity were consistent with previous findings. Notably, three two-way interaction terms were significantly associated with obesity: (1) race/ethnicity and gender, (2) gender and other people in the household, and (3) race/ethnicity and alcohol consumption.Conclusions. Future obesity prevention and/or intervention programs in Boston need to be primarily gender- and racially/ethnically specific to minimize cost and maximize results. Additional considerations are needed to take into account the differences in age, the presence of other people in the household, and education level.
dc.language.isoen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleDisparities in the Prevalence of Obesity in Boston: Results from the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalPublic Health Reports
dash.depositing.authorKawachi, Ichiro::3b17e788dad605ac69e3dd457b6c41ac::600
dc.date.available2019-08-30T11:19:54Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 87759
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/003335491112600512
dash.source.volume126;5
dash.source.page700


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