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dc.contributor.authorYang, Meng
dc.contributor.authorKenfield, Stacey
dc.contributor.authorVan Blarigan, Erin L.
dc.contributor.authorBatista, Julie
dc.contributor.authorSesso, Howard
dc.contributor.authorMa, Jing
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorChavarro, Jorge
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T15:17:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationYang, M., S. A. Kenfield, E. L. Van Blarigan, J. L. Batista, H. D. Sesso, J. Ma, M. J. Stampfer, and J. E. Chavarro. 2015. “Dietary Patterns after Prostate Cancer Diagnosis in Relation to Disease-Specific and Total Mortality.” Cancer Prevention Research 8 (6): 545–51. https://doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.capr-14-0442.
dc.identifier.issn1940-6207
dc.identifier.issn1940-6215
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41292449*
dc.description.abstractMen diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer have a long life expectancy, and many die of unrelated causes. It is therefore important to know to what extent post-diagnostic diet may affect disease-specific and overall mortality. A total of 926 men participating in the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer completed diet questionnaires for a median of 5.1 years after diagnosis, and were followed thereafter to assess mortality for a median of 9.9 years since questionnaire completion. Two post-diagnostic dietary patterns were identified: a Prudent pattern, characterized by higher intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, legumes, and whole grains; and a Western pattern, characterized by higher intake of processed and red meats, high-fat dairy and refined grains. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During 8,093 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 (17%) of prostate cancer. The Western pattern was significantly related to a higher risk of prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Comparing men in the highest versus the lowest quartile of the Western pattern, the HRs were 2.53 (95% CI, 1.00-6.42; P-trend = 0.02) for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 1.67 (95% CI, 1.16-2.42; P-trend = 0.01) for all-cause mortality. The Prudent pattern was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality (HRQuartile 4 vs. Quartile 1: 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44-0.93; P-trend = 0.02); the relationship with prostate cancer-specific mortality was inverse but not statistically significant. A post-diagnostic Western dietary pattern was associated with higher prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas a Prudent dietary pattern was related to lower all-cause mortality after prostate cancer diagnosis.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleDietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalCancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)
dash.depositing.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.date.available2019-09-05T15:17:00Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 24366
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0442
dash.source.volume8;6
dash.source.page545
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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