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dc.contributor.authorCurhan, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorEavey, Roland
dc.contributor.authorWang, Molin
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorCurhan, Gary
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T15:17:19Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationCurhan, Sharon G., Roland Eavey, Molin Wang, Meir J. Stampfer, and Gary C. Curhan. 2015. “Prospective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Self-Reported Hearing Loss in Women.” Alcohol 49 (1): 71–77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.10.001.
dc.identifier.issn0741-8329
dc.identifier.issn1873-6823
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41292478*
dc.description.abstractChronic excess alcohol intake has been associated with irreversible hearing loss and acute alcohol intake may temporarily impair auditory function; however, some evidence suggests that long-term moderate alcohol intake may be related to lower risk of hearing loss. This study prospectively examined the association between total alcohol and individual alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of hearing loss in women. Data were prospectively collected from 65,424 participants in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II), aged 27-44 years at baseline (follow-up 1991-2009). Alcohol consumption was assessed using a validated questionnaire every 4 years. An incident case was defined as a self-reported hearing problem that began after 1991. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. During 1,024,555 person-years of follow-up, 12,384 cases of hearing loss occurred. After multivariate adjustment, there was no significant association between total alcohol consumption and risk of hearing loss. In exploratory analyses, beer consumption was associated with increased risk and wine consumption was associated with reduced risk. No significant association was observed for consumption of liquor. Total alcohol consumption is not associated with risk of hearing loss in women. The modest associations observed for beer (direct) and wine (inverse) may be due to chance or residual confounding but merit further study.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Masson
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleProspective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Self-reported Hearing Loss in Women
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalAlcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.)
dash.depositing.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.date.available2019-09-05T15:17:19Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 7017
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.10.001
dash.source.volume49;1
dash.source.page71
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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