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dc.contributor.authorHendrickson, Whitney K.
dc.contributor.authorFlavin, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKasperzyk, Julie L.
dc.contributor.authorFiorentino, Michelangelo
dc.contributor.authorFang, Fang
dc.contributor.authorLis, Rosina
dc.contributor.authorFiore, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorPenney, Kathryn L.
dc.contributor.authorMa, Jing
dc.contributor.authorKantoff, Philip W.
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorLoda, Massimo
dc.contributor.authorMucci, Lorelei A.
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edward
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T18:09:36Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationHendrickson, Whitney K., Richard Flavin, Julie L. Kasperzyk, Michelangelo Fiorentino, Fang Fang, Rosina Lis, Christopher Fiore, et al. 2011. “Vitamin D Receptor Protein Expression in Tumor Tissue and Prostate Cancer Progression.” Journal of Clinical Oncology 29 (17): 2378–85. https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2010.30.9880.
dc.identifier.issn0732-183X
dc.identifier.issn1527-7755
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41292610*
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Data suggest that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to decrease proliferation and increase apoptosis for some malignancies, although evidence for prostate cancer is less clear. How VDR expression in tumor tissue may influence prostate cancer progression has not been evaluated in large studies. Patients and Methods: We examined protein expression of VDR in tumor tissue among 841 patients with prostate cancer in relation to risk of lethal prostate cancer within two prospective cohorts, the Physicians' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. We also examined the association of VDR expression with prediagnostic circulating 25(OH) D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and with two VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI.ResultsMen whose tumors had high VDR expression had significantly lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis (P for trend < .001), lower Gleason score (P for trend < .001), and less advanced tumor stage (P for trend < .001) and were more likely to have tumors harboring the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion (P for trend = .009). Compared with the lowest quartile, men whose tumors had the highest VDR expression had significantly reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.17; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.41). This association was only slightly attenuated after adjustment for Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.83) or, additionally, for tumor stage (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.94). Neither prediagnostic plasma vitamin D levels nor VDR polymorphisms were associated with VDR expression. Conclusion: High VDR expression in prostate tumors is associated with a reduced risk of lethal cancer, suggesting a role of the vitamin D pathway in prostate cancer progression. J Clin Oncol 29:2378-2385.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleVitamin D Receptor Protein Expression in Tumor Tissue and Prostate Cancer Progression
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalJournal of Clinical Oncology
dash.depositing.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.date.available2019-09-05T18:09:36Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 49279
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/JCO.2010.30.9880
dash.source.volume29;17
dash.source.page2378
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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