Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSun, Qi
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Mary K.
dc.contributor.authorOkereke, Olivia I.
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric Bruce::0ab2926c8242f35e5a982e3cf59f4987::600
dc.contributor.authorHu, Frank B.
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorGrodstein, Francine
dc.contributor.authorHay, Phillipa J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T18:09:40Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationSun, Qi, Mary K. Townsend, Olivia I. Okereke, Eric B. Rimm, Frank B. Hu, Meir J. Stampfer, and Francine Grodstein. 2011. “Alcohol Consumption at Midlife and Successful Ageing in Women: A Prospective Cohort Analysis in the Nurses’ Health Study.” Edited by Phillipa J. Hay. PLoS Medicine 8 (9): e1001090. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001090.
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277
dc.identifier.issn1549-1676
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41292615*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Observational studies have documented inverse associations between moderate alcohol consumption and risk of premature death. It is largely unknown whether moderate alcohol intake is also associated with overall health and well-being among populations who have survived to older age. In this study, we prospectively examined alcohol use assessed at midlife in relation to successful ageing in a cohort of US women. Methods and Findings: Alcohol consumption at midlife was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Subsequently, successful ageing was defined in 13,894 Nurses' Health Study participants who survived to age 70 or older, and whose health status was continuously updated. "Successful ageing" was considered as being free of 11 major chronic diseases and having no major cognitive impairment, physical impairment, or mental health limitations. Analyses were restricted to the 98.1% of participants who were not heavier drinkers (>45 g/d) at midlife. Of all eligible study participants, 1,491 (10.7%) achieved successful ageing. After multivariable adjustment of potential confounders, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption at midlife was associated with modestly increased odds of successful ageing. The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.0 (referent) for nondrinkers, 1.11 (0.96-1.29) for <= 5.0 g/d, 1.19 (1.01-1.40) for 5.1-15.0 g/d, 1.28 (1.03-1.58) for 15.1-30.0 g/d, and 1.24 (0.87-1.76) for 30.1-45.0 g/d. Meanwhile, independent of total alcohol intake, participants who drank alcohol at regular patterns throughout the week, rather than on a single occasion, had somewhat better odds of successful ageing; for example, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.29 (1.01-1.64) and 1.47 (1.14-1.90) for those drinking 3-4 days and 5-7 days per week in comparison with nondrinkers, respectively, whereas the odds ratio was 1.10 (0.94-1.30) for those drinking only 1-2 days per week. Conclusions: These data suggest that regular, moderate consumption of alcohol at midlife may be related to a modest increase in overall health status among women who survive to older ages.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleAlcohol Consumption at Midlife and Successful Ageing in Women: A Prospective Cohort Analysis in the Nurses' Health Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalPLoS Medicine
dash.depositing.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.date.available2019-09-05T18:09:40Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 83403
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.1001090
dash.source.volume8;9
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record