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dc.contributor.authorChavarro, J. E.
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorLi, H.
dc.contributor.authorCampos, H.
dc.contributor.authorKurth, T.
dc.contributor.authorMa, J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T14:15:36Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationChavarro, J. E., M. J. Stampfer, H. Li, H. Campos, T. Kurth, and J. Ma. 2007. “A Prospective Study of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Levels in Blood and Prostate Cancer Risk.” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 16 (7): 1364–70. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.epi-06-1033.
dc.identifier.issn1055-9965
dc.identifier.issn1538-7755
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41292893*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Animal models suggest that n-3 fatty acids inhibit prostate cancer proliferation, whereas n-6 fatty acids promote it, but epidemiologic studies do not uniformly support these findings. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted among 14,916 apparently healthy men who provided blood samples in 1982. Blood fatty acid levels were determined for 476 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during a 13-year follow-up and their matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CD of total, non-aggressive (stage A/B and Gleason < 7) and aggressive (stage C/D, Gleason 7, subsequent distant metastasis or death) prostate cancer associated with blood levels of specific fatty acids expressed as percentages of total fatty acids. Results: Whole blood levels of all long-chain n-3 fatty acids examined and of linoleic acid were inversely related to overall prostate cancer risk (RRQ5vs.Q1, 0-59; 95% CI, 0.38-0.93; P-trend = 0.01 for total long-chain n-3 fatty acids and RRQ5vs.Q1 0.62; 95% CI, 0.41-0.95; P-trend = 0.03 for linoleic). Blood levels of gamma-linolenic and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acids, fatty acids resulting from the metabolism of linoleic acid, were directly associated with prostate cancer (RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.94-2.12; Ptrend = 0.05 for gamma-linolenic and RR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.03-2.30; P-trend = 0.02 for dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid). Levels of arachidonic and ct-linolenic acids were unrelated to prostate cancer. Conclusions: Higher blood levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, mainly found in marine foods, and of linoleic acid, mainly found in non-hydrogenated vegetable oils, are associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The direct associations of linoleic acid metabolites with prostate cancer risk deserve further investigation.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleA Prospective Study of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Levels in Blood and Prostate Cancer Risk
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
dash.depositing.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.date.available2019-09-06T14:15:36Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 18462
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-1033
dash.source.volume16;7
dash.source.page1364-1370
dash.contributor.affiliatedStampfer, Meir


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