Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNagy, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T09:06:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-15
dc.identifier.citationNagy, Joseph Falaky. 2018. Vermin Gone Bad in Medieval Scandinavian, Persian, and Irish Traditions. In Old Norse Mythology—Comparative Perspectives, edited by Pernille Hermann, Stephen A. Mitchell, Jens Peter Schjødt, and Amber J. Rose, 323-340. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780674975699en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41302219*
dc.description.abstractThe tales in medieval Scandinavian literature centered on the legendary entrepreneur Ragnarr loðbrók, his wives, and his sons famously feature several serpentine motifs. The narrative construct of a family literally and metaphorically bound together by dragon-like creatures under the control of a daughter, wife, or mother is also to be found in Iranian and Irish storytelling tradition. The parallels point to a genetic mythological relationship among these (in other respects) disparate stories, whose deep-seated affinity cannot be explained on the basis of intercultural borrowing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCeltic Languages and Literaturesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherHarvard University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://chs.harvard.edu/CHS/article/display/6854.joseph-falaky-nagy-vermin-gone-bad-in-medieval-scandinavian-persian-and-irish-traditionsen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleVermin Gone Bad in Medieval Scandinavian, Persian, and Irish Traditionsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dash.depositing.authorNagy, Joseph
dc.date.available2019-09-10T09:06:52Z
dc.relation.bookOld Norse Mythology—Comparative Perspectivesen_US
dash.workflow.commentsFAR2017en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedNagy, Joseph


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record