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dc.contributor.authorJun, Hee-Jin
dc.contributor.authorCorliss, Heather
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorPazaris, Mathew
dc.contributor.authorSpiegelman, Donna
dc.contributor.authorAustin, S. Bryn
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-21T16:11:02Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationJun, Hee-Jin, Heather L. Corliss, Lauren P. Nichols, Mathew J. Pazaris, Donna Spiegelman, and S. Bryn Austin. 2012. “Adult Body Mass Index Trajectories and Sexual Orientation.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine 42 (4): 348–54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.11.011.
dc.identifier.issn0749-3797
dc.identifier.issn1873-2607
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41384679*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cross-sectional research has documented elevated prevalence of obesity in lesbian and bisexual women relative to heterosexual women, but little is known about disparities in longitudinal patterns in BMI change during adulthood.Purpose: To examine sexual orientation-related disparities in individual BMI trajectories throughout adulthood. Methods: Data on BMI, sexual orientation, and sociodemographics were gathered prospectively from 1989 through 2005 from 90,713 U.S. women in the Nurses' Health Study II and examined in 2011 using general growth mixture modeling to identify BMI trajectories from ages 25 to 59 years. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine whether sexual orientation was associated with BMI trajectory group membership. Results: Four BMI trajectory groups were identified and labeled based on mean BMI within each group at baseline and final follow-up: Group 1: slow-weight-gain trajectory; Group 2: moderate-weight-gain trajectory; Group 3: rapid-weight-gain trajectory; and Group 4: obese-to-overweight trajectory. Lesbian and bisexual women showed consistently higher odds of membership in Groups 2-4 (adverse-weight-gain trajectories) versus Group 1 (the slow-weight-gain trajectory) relative to heterosexual women. Conclusions: Both lesbian and bisexual women were more likely than heterosexual women to experience adverse-weight-gain trajectories in adulthood. New research efforts are needed to understand and eliminate these pronounced disparities. (Am J Prev Med 2012;42(4):348-354)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleAdult Body Mass Index Trajectories and Sexual Orientation: The Nurses’ Health Study II
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
dash.depositing.authorSpiegelman, Donna::37eeac21962b33e4e46e7aedde542849::600
dc.date.available2019-09-21T16:11:02Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 6042
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amepre.2011.11.011
dash.source.volume42;4
dash.source.page348


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