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dc.contributor.authorJakobsen, Marianne U.
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Eilis J.
dc.contributor.authorHeitmann, Berit L.
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorBälter, Katarina
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Gary E.
dc.contributor.authorGoldbourt, Uri
dc.contributor.authorHallmans, Göran
dc.contributor.authorKnekt, Paul
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Simin
dc.contributor.authorPietinen, Pirjo
dc.contributor.authorSpiegelman, Donna
dc.contributor.authorStevens, June
dc.contributor.authorVirtamo, Jarmo
dc.contributor.authorWillett, Walter C.::94559ea206eef8a8844fc5b80654fa5b::600
dc.contributor.authorAscherio, Alberto
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-21T16:11:19Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJakobsen, Marianne U, Eilis J O’Reilly, Berit L Heitmann, Mark A Pereira, Katarina Bälter, Gary E Fraser, Uri Goldbourt, et al. 2009. “Major Types of Dietary Fat and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Pooled Analysis of 11 Cohort Studies.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 89 (5): 1425–32. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27124.
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165
dc.identifier.issn1938-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41384700*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake increases plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations; therefore, intake should be reduced to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD). Lower habitual intakes of SFAs, however, require substitution of other macronutrients to maintain energy balance. Objective: We investigated associations between energy intake from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and carbohydrates and risk of CHD while assessing the potential effect-modifying role of sex and age. Using substitution models, our aim was to clarify whether energy from unsaturated fatty acids or carbohydrates should replace energy from SFAs to prevent CHD. Design: This was a follow-up study in which data from 11 American and European cohort studies were pooled. The outcome measure was incident CHD. Results: During 4-10 y of follow-up, 5249 coronary events and 2155 coronary deaths occurred among 344,696 persons. For a 5% lower energy intake from SFAs and a concomitant higher energy intake from PUFAs, there was a significant inverse association between PUFAs and risk of coronary events (hazard ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.97); the hazard ratio for coronary deaths was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.89). For a 5% lower energy intake from SFAs and a concomitant higher energy intake from carbohydrates, there was a modest significant direct association between carbohydrates and coronary events (hazard ratio: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.14); the hazard ratio for coronary deaths was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.13). MUFA intake was not associated with CHD. No effect modification by sex or age was found. Conclusion: The associations suggest that replacing SFAs with PUFAs rather than MUFAs or carbohydrates prevents CHD over a wide range of intakes. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1425-32.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleMajor types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dash.depositing.authorSpiegelman, Donna::37eeac21962b33e4e46e7aedde542849::600
dc.date.available2019-09-21T16:11:19Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 7094
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/ajcn.2008.27124
dash.source.volume89;5
dash.source.page1425


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