Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKim, Seoyoung
dc.contributor.authorGlynn, Robert
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edward
dc.contributor.authorHernandez-Diaz, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorKarlson, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorSchneeweiss, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T15:33:45Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationKim, Seoyoung C, Robert J Glynn, Edward Giovannucci, Sonia Hernández-Díaz, Jun Liu, Sarah Feldman, Elizabeth W Karlson, Sebastian Schneeweiss, and Daniel H Solomon. 2014. “Risk of High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia and Cervical Cancer in Women with Systemic Inflammatory Diseases: A Population-Based Cohort Study.” Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 74 (7): 1360–67. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204993.
dc.identifier.issn0003-4967
dc.identifier.issn1468-2060
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41392010*
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous studies have suggested a potential risk of cervical cancer in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases (SID) such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objectives: To assess the risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia, a surrogate endpoint for cervical cancer and cervical cancer, in women with SID, including IBD, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or SLE, compared with the risk in women without SID. Methods: Using US insurance data (2001-2012), we conducted a cohort study of 133 333 women with SID, based on two or more diagnoses and one or more dispensed prescription for disease-specific treatment, and 533 332 women without SID. High-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer was defined by a validated algorithm with a positive predictive value of >= 81%. Results: Over the mean follow-up of 2.1 years, the crude incidence rate of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer per 100 000 person-years was the highest at 141.1 in SLE and the lowest at 82.2 in psoriasis among women with SID, and 73.4 in women without SID. The multivariable HR adjusted for potential confounders was 1.07 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.45) in IBD, 0.96 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.27) in psoriasis, 1.49 (95% CI 1.11 to 2.00) in RA and 1.53 (95% CI 1.07 to 2.19) in SLE. Multivariable HRs were increased, but not statistically significant, in IBD, RA and SLE with baseline use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs or steroids. Conclusions: The risk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer was 1.5 times higher in women with RA and SLE than in those without SID. The risk may be increased in IBD with use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs or steroids.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleRisk of high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women with systemic inflammatory diseases: a population-based cohort study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript
dc.relation.journalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
dash.depositing.authorGiovannucci, Edward L.::fd8dcb59a5a5859f2a85fabae12a60cf::600
dc.date.available2019-09-23T15:33:45Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 6741
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204993
dash.source.volume74;7
dash.source.page1360


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record