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dc.contributor.authorRehding, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorKreuzer, Gundula
dc.contributor.authorMcMurray, Peter
dc.contributor.authorKrämer, Sybille
dc.contributor.authorMoseley, Roger
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-24T08:51:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-01
dc.identifier.citationAlexander Rehding, Gundula Kreuzer, Peter McMurray, Sybille Krämer, Roger Moseley Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 70 No. 1, Spring 2017; (pp. 221-256)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-0139en_US
dc.identifier.issn1547-3848en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41392851*
dc.description.abstractAt first blush, the pair discrete/continuous seems to take us far from the concerns of musicology and place us firmly in the realm of statistics, data analysis, and number crunching. Put graphically, “discrete data” translates into dots or interrupted lines, while “continuous data” implies a curve. This would mean counting and measuring— how can these activities be relevant to music?en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMusicen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of California Pressen_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.titleDiscrete/Continuous: Music and Media Theory after Kittleren_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAuthor's Originalen_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of the American Musicological Societyen_US
dash.depositing.authorRehding, Alexander
dc.date.available2019-09-24T08:51:21Z
dash.workflow.commentsFAR2017en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1525/jams.2017.70.1.221
dc.source.journalJ AM MUSIC SOC
dash.source.volume70;1
dash.source.page221-256
dash.contributor.affiliatedRehding, Alexander


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