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dc.contributor.authorPineda, Jaime E.
dc.contributor.authorArce, Héctor G.
dc.contributor.authorSchnee, Scott
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Alyssa A.
dc.contributor.authorBourke, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Jonathan B.
dc.contributor.authorRobitaille, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorTanner, Joel
dc.contributor.authorKauffmann, Jens
dc.contributor.authorTafalla, Mario
dc.contributor.authorCaselli, Paola
dc.contributor.authorAnglada, Guillem
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-24T17:26:16Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationPineda, Jaime E., Héctor G. Arce, Scott Schnee, Alyssa A. Goodman, Tyler Bourke, Jonathan B. Foster, Thomas Robitaille, et al. 2011. “THE ENIGMATIC CORE L1451-Mm: A FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE? OR A HIDDEN VeLLO?” The Astrophysical Journal 743 (2): 201. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637x/743/2/201.
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41397494*
dc.description.abstractWe present the detection of a dust continuum source at 3 mm (CARMA) and 1.3 mm (Submillimeter Array, SMA), and (12)CO (2-1) emission (SMA) toward the L1451-mm dense core. These detections suggest a compact object and an outflow where no point source at mid-infrared wavelengths is detected using Spitzer. An upper limit for the dense core bolometric luminosity of 0.05 L(circle dot) is obtained. By modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution and the continuum interferometric visibilities simultaneously, we confirm that a central source of heating is needed to explain the observations. This modeling also shows that the data can be well fitted by a dense core with a young stellar object (YSO) and a disk, or by a dense core with a central first hydrostatic core (FHSC). Unfortunately, we are not able to decide between these two models, which produce similar fits. We also detect (12)CO (2-1) emission with redshifted and blueshifted emission suggesting the presence of a slow and poorly collimated outflow, in opposition to what is usually found toward YSOs but in agreement with prediction from simulations of an FHSC. This presents the best candidate, so far, for an FHSC, an object that has been identified in simulations of collapsing dense cores. Whatever the true nature of the central object in L1451-mm, this core presents an excellent laboratory to study the earliest phases of low-mass star formation.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Astronomical Society
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleThe Enigmatic Core L1451-mm: A First Hydrostatic Core? Or a Hidden Vello?
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalThe Astrophysical Journal
dash.depositing.authorGoodman, Alyssa::c0b10f48de57a53ff56cc8d4fee4155a::600
dc.date.available2019-09-24T17:26:16Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 98923
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/201
dash.source.volume743;2
dash.source.page201


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