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dc.contributor.authorPesola, Jean
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jia
dc.contributor.authorKnipe, David
dc.contributor.authorCoen, Donald
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-05T03:27:20Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationPesola, J. M., J. Zhu, D. M. Knipe, and D. M. Coen. 2005. “Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Immediate-Early and Early Gene Expression during Reactivation from Latency under Conditions That Prevent Infectious Virus Production.” Journal of Virology 79 (23): 14516–25. https://doi.org/10.1128/jvi.79.23.14516-14525.2005.
dc.identifier.issn0022-538X
dc.identifier.issn1070-6321
dc.identifier.issn1098-5514
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41482923*
dc.description.abstractThe program of gene expression exhibited by herpes simplex virus during productive infection of cultured cells is well established; however, less is known about the regulatory controls governing reactivation from latency in neurons. One difficulty in examining gene regulation during reactivation lies in distinguishing between events occurring in initial reactivating cells versus events occurring in secondarily infected cells. Thus, two inhibitors were employed to block production of infectious virus: acyclovir, which inhibits viral DNA synthesis, and WAY-150138, which permits viral DNA synthesis but inhibits viral DNA encapsidation. Latently infected murine ganglia were explanted in the presence of either inhibitor, and then amounts of RNA, DNA, or infectious virus were quantified. In ganglia explanted for 48 h, the levels of five immediate-early and early RNAs did not exhibit meaningful differences between acyclovir and WAY-150138 treatments when analyzed by in situ hybridization or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. However, comparative increases in viral DNA and RNA content in untreated ganglia suggested that virus was produced before 48 h postexplant. This was confirmed by the detection of infectious virus as early as 14 h postexplant. Together, these results suggest that high levels of viral gene expression at 48 h postexplant are due largely to the production of infectious virus and subsequent spread through the tissue. These results lead to a reinterpretation of previous results indicating a role for DNA replication in immediate-early and early viral gene expression; however, it remains possible that viral gene expression is regulated differently in neurons than in cultured cells.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleHerpes Simplex Virus 1 Immediate-Early and Early Gene Expression during Reactivation from Latency under Conditions That Prevent Infectious Virus Production
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalJournal of Virology
dash.depositing.authorCoen, Donald Mark::f1d1eb8434c5ee0d3e2fa13c1a313e4d::600
dc.date.available2019-10-05T03:27:20Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 62913
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.79.23.14516-14525.2005
dash.source.volume79;23
dash.source.page14516


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