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dc.contributor.authorChen, Hongmin
dc.contributor.authorWei, Shui-Qing
dc.contributor.authorEngelman, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-05T03:28:13Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationChen, Hongmin, Shui-Qing Wei, and Alan Engelman. 1999. “Multiple Integrase Functions Are Required to Form the Native Structure of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Intasome.” Journal of Biological Chemistry 274 (24): 17358–64. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.274.24.17358.
dc.identifier.issn0021-9258
dc.identifier.issn1083-351X
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41482988*
dc.description.abstractMu-mediated polymerase chain reaction footprinting was used to investigate the protein-DNA structure of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-I) preintegration complexes. Preintegration complexes were partially purified from cells after using an established coculture infection technique as well as a novel technique using cell-free supernatant from transfected cells as the source of virus. Footprinting revealed that bound proteins protected the terminal 200-250 base pairs of each viral end from nuclease attack. Bound proteins also caused strong transpositional enhancements near each end of HIV-I. In contrast, regions of viral DNA internal to the ends did not show evidence of strong protein binding. The end regions of preintegrative HIV-I apparently form a unique nucleoprotein structure, which we term the intasome to distinguish it from the greater preintegration complex. Our novel system also allowed us to analyze the structure and function of preintegration complexes isolated from cells infected with integrase mutant viruses. Complexes were derived from viruses defective for either integrase catalysis, integrase binding to the viral DNA substrate, or an unknown function in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the integrase protein. None of these mutant complexes supported detectable integration activity. Despite the presence of the mutant integrase proteins in purified samples, none of these nucleoprotein complexes displayed the native intasome structure detected in wildtype preintegration complexes. We conclude that multiple integrase functions are required to form the native structure of the HIV-I intasome in infected cells.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleMultiple Integrase Functions Are Required to Form the Native Structure of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Intasome
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalThe Journal of Biological Chemistry
dash.depositing.authorEngelman, Alan N.::d24f388fc75569a343fc8e6e8fe32650::600
dc.date.available2019-10-05T03:28:13Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 105696
dc.identifier.doi10.1074/jbc.274.24.17358
dash.source.volume274;24
dash.source.page17358-17364


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