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dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Kathy
dc.contributor.authorSpreng, R. Nathan
dc.contributor.authorMadore, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorSchacter, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-17T07:11:14Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationGerlach, Kathy D., R. Nathan Spreng, Kevin P. Madore, and Daniel L. Schacter. 2014. “Future Planning: Default Network Activity Couples with Frontoparietal Control Network and Reward-Processing Regions during Process and Outcome Simulations.” Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 9 (12): 1942–51. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsu001.
dc.identifier.issn1749-5016
dc.identifier.issn1749-5024
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41555798*
dc.description.abstractWe spend much of our daily lives imagining how we can reach future goals and what will happen when we attain them. Despite the prevalence of such goal-directed simulations, neuroimaging studies on planning have mainly focused on executive processes in the frontal lobe. This experiment examined the neural basis of process simulations, during which participants imagined themselves going through steps toward attaining a goal, and outcome simulations, during which participants imagined events they associated with achieving a goal. In the scanner, participants engaged in these simulation tasks and an odd/even control task. We hypothesized that process simulations would recruit default and frontoparietal control network regions, and that outcome simulations, which allow us to anticipate the affective consequences of achieving goals, would recruit default and reward-processing regions. Our analysis of brain activity that covaried with process and outcome simulations confirmed these hypotheses. A functional connectivity analysis with posterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior inferior parietal lobule seeds showed that their activity was correlated during process simulations and associated with a distributed network of default and frontoparietal control network regions. During outcome simulations, medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala seeds covaried together and formed a functional network with default and reward-processing regions.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleFuture planning: default network activity couples with frontoparietal control network and reward-processing regions during process and outcome simulations
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.description.versionVersion of Record
dc.relation.journalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
dash.depositing.authorSchacter, Daniel L.::e94dca167253512470c09bde2d26790b::600
dc.date.available2019-10-17T07:11:14Z
dash.workflow.comments1Science Serial ID 92859
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/scan/nsu001
dash.source.volume9;12
dash.source.page1942


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