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dc.contributor.authorParrish, Raymond C.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-05T08:59:34Z
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issued2019-03-26
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationParrish, Raymond C. 2018. Patient Satisfaction and Its Relation to Perceived Visit Duration With a Hand Surgeon. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard Medical School.
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:41973468*
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine whether patient perception of time spent with a hand surgeon relates to patient satisfaction after a single new patient office visit. Methods: Prior to each visit, 112 consecutive new patients predicted how much time they expected to spend with the surgeon. Following the visit, patients were asked to estimate the time spent with the surgeon, indicate whether the surgeon appeared rushed, and rate their overall satisfaction with the surgeon. Wait time and actual visit duration were measured. Patients also completed a sociodemographic survey, the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure, the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) health literacy test, and 3 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-based questionnaires: Upper-Extremity Function, Pain Interference, and Depression. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to determine predictors of patient satisfaction, patient-perceived surgeon rush, and high previsit expectations of visit duration. Results: Patient satisfaction was not associated with perceived visit duration, but did correlate strongly with patient-rated surgeon empathy and symptoms of depression. Neither visit duration nor previsit expectations of visit length were determinants of patient-perceived surgeon rush; only surgeon empathy was associated. Less educated patients anticipated needing more time with the surgeon. Conclusions: Patient satisfaction with the surgeon and with the time spent during the office visit was primarily linked to surgeon empathy rather than to visit duration or previsit expectation of visit length. Efforts to make hand surgery office visits more patient centered should focus on improving dialogue quality, and not necessarily on making visits longer. Type of study/level of evidence: Prognostic II.
dc.description.sponsorshipScholarly Project
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectDoctor rush, empathy, expectations, patient satisfaction, visit duration.
dc.titlePatient Satisfaction and Its Relation to Perceived Visit Duration With a Hand Surgeon
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorParrish, Raymond C.
dc.date.available2019-12-05T08:59:34Z
thesis.degree.date2018
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Medical School
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Medicine
dc.type.materialtext
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailrcparrishii@gmail.com


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