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dc.contributor.advisorHowell, David
dc.contributor.authorGhadimi, Amin
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-12T09:29:31Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-05-17
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.citationGhadimi, Amin. 2019. Disorder and the Japanese Revolution, 1871–1877. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:42029815*
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines how intellectual disorder produced social and political disorder in 1870s Japan. The simultaneous collapse of the early modern Japanese diplomatic and social systems created unprecedented freedom to know globally, to be individually, and to depart from the past. This freedom, enabled by a revolution into globality, engendered a crisis of justice: it deranged the ideational relationships between the domestic and the foreign; among individual, state, and community; and between past and present. Intellectual contest over who determined these relationships and how people should understand them continually precipitated into armed violence as men fought to realize or combat particular configurations of enlightenment and counter-enlightenment thought. The ideational and militant contest over how to generate equilibrium between freedom and order in a global world was the Japanese revolution. The dissertation takes as evidence the intellectual dimensions of major developments in the political, social, and diplomatic history of early Meiji Japan: the Iwakura Embassy of 1871 and the political instability of the caretaker government it left behind (chapter 1); the diplomatic crises of 1873 (chapter 2); the rise of the Movement for Freedom and Civil Rights (chapter 3); the Saga Rebellion of 1874 (chapter 4); the Shinpūren Rebellion of 1876 (chapter 5); and the civil war of 1877 (chapter 6).
dc.description.sponsorshipEast Asian Languages and Civilizations
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectrevolution
dc.subjectdisorder
dc.subjectMeiji
dc.subjectfreedom
dc.subjectrights
dc.subjectrebellion
dc.subjectenlightenment
dc.subjectcounter-enlightenment
dc.subjectglobalization
dc.titleDisorder and the Japanese Revolution, 1871–1877
dc.typeThesis or Dissertation
dash.depositing.authorGhadimi, Amin
dc.date.available2019-12-12T09:29:31Z
thesis.degree.date2019
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciences
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGordon, Andrew
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBotsman, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSiniawer, Eiko Maruko
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.departmentEast Asian Languages and Civilizations
thesis.degree.departmentEast Asian Languages and Civilizations
dash.identifier.vireo
dash.author.emailghadimiamin@gmail.com


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