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dc.contributor.authorInouye, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Dorothy I.
dc.contributor.authorFugal, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Elizabeth H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-26T10:09:44Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2014-12-19T21:52:34-05:00
dc.identifier.citationInouye, Sharon K., Dorothy I. Baker, Patricia Fugal, and Elizabeth H. Bradley. 2006. Dissemination of the Hospital Elder Life Program: Implementation, Adaptation, and Successes. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 54, no.10 (October): 1492–1499.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-8614en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:42668756*
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) across dissemination sites, to detail adaptations, and to summarize advantages across sites. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: HELP sites in acute care hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Thirteen sites that enrolled 11,344 patients. MEASUREMENTS: Seventy-five closed- and open-ended questions describing details of the HELP site, procedures, staffing, outcomes tracked, and advantages. RESULTS: As of July 1, 2005, HELP had been fully implemented in 13 sites, with a median duration of 24 months (range 6.0–38.0). Although a high degree of fidelity to the original model was maintained, variations existed in staffing patterns, outcome tracking, and recommended HELP procedures. Adaptations were made across multiple domains, including enrollment criteria at 15.4% of sites, screening and assessment tools at 61.5%, and individual intervention protocols at 15.4% to 30.8%. Local circumstances drove these adaptations, with the most common reasons being lack of adequate staffing and logistical constraints. All sites conducted regular HELP staff meetings; other recommended quality assurance procedures were conducted at 46.2% to 92.3% of sites. Reported advantages of HELP included providing an educational resource at 100% of sites, improving hospital outcomes (e.g., delirium and functional decline) at 100%, providing nursing education and improving retention at 100%, enhancing patient and family satisfaction with care at 92.3%, raising visibility for geriatrics at 92.3%, and improving quality of care at 84.6%. CONCLUSION: This report describes the real-world implementation of HELP across 13 sites, documents their local adaptations and successes, and provides insight into how motivated institutions can create change to improve quality of care for older persons.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2006.00869.xen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectHospital Elder Life Programen_US
dc.subjectdelirium preventionen_US
dc.subjecthospital careen_US
dc.subjectgeriatricsen_US
dc.subjectgeriatric assessmenten_US
dc.subjectacute care for the elderlyen_US
dc.subjectiatrogenesisen_US
dc.titleDissemination of the Hospital Elder Life Program: Implementation, Adaptation, and Successesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2014-12-20T02:52:34Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.rights.holderInouye SK, Baker DI, Fugal P, Bradley EH
dc.relation.journalJournal of the American Geriatrics Societyen_US
dash.depositing.authorInouye, Sharon
dc.date.available2020-05-26T10:09:44Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1532-5415.2006.00869.x*
dash.contributor.affiliatedInouye, Sharon


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